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Learning with sublexical information from emerging reading vocabularies in exceptionally early and normal reading development
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
University of Otago, New Zealand.
Australian Catholic University, Australia.
Australian Catholic University, Australia.
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2015 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 136, p. 166-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predictions from theories of the processes of word reading acquisition have rarely been tested against evidence from exceptionally early readers. The theories of Ehri, Share, and Byrne, and an alternative, Knowledge Sources theory, were so tested. The former three theories postulate that full development of context-free letter sounds and awareness of phonemes are required for normal acquisition, while the claim of the alternative is that with or without such, children can use sublexical information from their emerging reading vocabularies to acquire word reading. Results from two independent samples of children aged 3-5, and 5 years, with mean word reading levels of 7 and 9 years respectively, showed underdevelopment of their context-free letter sounds and phoneme awareness, relative to their word reading levels and normal comparison samples. Despite such underdevelopment, these exceptional readers engaged in a form of phonological recoding that enabled pseudoword reading, at the level of older-age normal controls matched on word reading level. Moreover, in the 5-year-old sample further experiments showed that, relative to normal controls, they had a bias toward use of sublexical information from their reading vocabularies for phonological recoding of heterophonic pseudowords with irregular consistent spelling, and were superior in accessing word meanings independently of phonology, although only if the readers were without exposure to explicit phonics. The three theories were less satisfactory than the alternative theory in accounting for the learning of the exceptionally early readers. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 136, p. 166-185
Keywords [en]
Reading development, Early readers, Phoneme awareness, Letter-sound knowledge, Lexical orthography, Reading speed
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Educational Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70831DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2014.11.032ISI: 000349882600016PubMedID: 25498743OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70831DiVA, id: diva2:1283682
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved

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Margrain, Valerie

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  • apa
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