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Childhood urbanicity and hair steroid hormone levels in ten-year-old children
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5053-8373
Radboud University, the Netherlands.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2986-2128
Radboud University, the Netherlands.
2019 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 102, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research suggests that it may be more stressful for children to grow up in an urban area than in a rural area. Urbanicity may affect physiological stress system functioning as well as the timing of sexual maturation. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether moderate urbanicity (current and childhood, ranging from rural areas to small cities) was associated with indices of long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functioning (cortisol, cortisone, dehydroepiandrosterone and progesterone levels) and whether sex moderated any associations. Method: Children (N = 92) were all 10 years old and from the Dutch general population. Hair samples were collected and single segments (the three cm most proximal to the scalp) were assayed for concentrations of steroid hormones (LCMS/MS method). Neighborhood-level urbanicity and socioeconomic status were measured from birth through age ten years. Analyses were controlled for neighborhood- and family socioeconomic status, body mass index and season of sampling. Results: The results from multivariate analyses of variance showed no associations between current or childhood moderate urbanicity and hair steroid hormone concentrations. Interaction terms between moderate urbanicity and sex were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Associations between urbanicity and steroid hormone levels may only be detectable in highly urban areas and/or during later stages of adolescence. Alternatively, our findings may have been due to most children being from families with a higher socioeconomic status. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2019. Vol. 102, p. 53-57
Keywords [en]
Children, Hair, HPA axis, Socioeconomic status, Steroid hormones, Urbanicity
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70586DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.11.039Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057427089OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70586DiVA, id: diva2:1273098
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved

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Evans, BrittanyHagquist, Curt

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