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Association of Prenatal Phthalate Exposure with Language Development in Early Childhood
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0417-1686
Lunds universitet.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.
Örebro University.
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2018 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 172, no 12, p. 1169-1176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Prenatal exposure to phthalates has been associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes, but little is known about the association with language development. Objective: To examine the association of prenatal phthalate exposure with language development in children in 2 population-based pregnancy cohort studies. Design, Setting, and Participants: Data for this study were obtained from the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and Child, Asthma and Allergy (SELMA) study conducted in prenatal clinics throughout Värmland county in Sweden and The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES) conducted in 4 academic centers in the United States. Participants recruited into both studies were women in their first trimester of pregnancy who had literacy in Swedish (SELMA) or English or Spanish (TIDES). This study included mothers and their children from both the SELMA study (n = 963) and TIDES (n = 370) who had complete data on prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite levels, language delay, and modeled covariables. For SELMA, the data were collected from November 1, 2007, to June 30, 2013, and data analysis was conducted from November 1, 2016, to June 30, 2018. For TIDES, data collection began January 1, 2010, and ended March 29, 2016, and data analysis was performed from September 15, 2016, to June 30, 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mothers completed a language development questionnaire that asked the number of words their children could understand or use at a median of 30 months of age (SELMA) and 37 months of age (TIDES). The responses were categorized as fewer than 25, 25 to 50, and more than 50 words, with 50 words or fewer classified as language delay. Results: In the SELMA study, 963 mothers, 455 (47.2%) girls, and 508 [52.8%] boys were included. In TIDES, 370 mothers, 185 (50.0%) girls, and 185 (50.0%) boys were included in this analysis. The prevalence of language delay was 10.0% in both SELMA (96 reported) and TIDES (37 reported), with higher rates of delay in boys than girls (SELMA: 69 [13.5%] vs 27 [6.0%]; TIDES: 12 [12.4%] vs 14 [7.6%]). In crude analyses, the metabolite levels of dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate were statistically significantly associated with language delay in both cohorts. In adjusted analyses, a doubling of prenatal exposure of dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate metabolites increased the odds ratio (OR) for language delay by approximately 25% to 40%, with statistically significant results in the SELMA study (dibutyl phthalate OR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.03-1.63; P =.03]; butyl benzyl phthalate OR, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.07-1.49; P =.003]). A doubling of prenatal monoethyl phthalate exposure was associated with an approximately 15% increase in the OR for language delay in the SELMA study (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.31; P =.05), but no such association was found in TIDES (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.23). Conclusions and Relevance: In findings from this study, prenatal exposure to dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate was statistically significantly associated with language delay in children in both the SELMA study and TIDES. These findings, along with the prevalence of prenatal exposure to phthalates, the importance of language development, and the inconsistent results from a 2017 Danish study, suggest that the association of phthalates with language delay may warrant further examination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association , 2018. Vol. 172, no 12, p. 1169-1176
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70355DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.3115ISI: 000452130600014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85055817441OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70355DiVA, id: diva2:1266835
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved

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Bornehag, Carl-GustafUnenge Hallerbäck, Maria

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