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An angled rack with a bypass and a nature-like fishway pass Atlantic salmon smolts downstream at a hydropower dam
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3098-0594
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Elghagen Fiskevård, Långgatan 10, Åstorp.
BNGF GmbH-Büro für Naturschutz-Gewässer-und Fischereifragen, Pähl, D-82396, Germany.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8738-8815
2018 (English)In: Marine and Freshwater Research, ISSN 1323-1650, E-ISSN 1448-6059, Vol. 69, no 12, p. 1894-1904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydropower dams disrupt longitudinal connectivity and cause fragmentation of river systems, which has led to declines in migratory fish species. Atlantic salmon smolts rely on intact longitudinal connectivity to move downstream from rearing habitats in freshwater to feeding grounds at sea. Smolts often suffer increased mortality and delays when they encounter hydropower plants during their downstream migration. Currently, there are few examples of downstream passage solutions that allow safe and timely passage. We assessed the performance of two passage solutions at a hydropower dam, namely, an angled 15-mm rack with a bypass and a large nature-like fishway. The performance of these new fish passage solutions was evaluated by tracking radio-tagged Atlantic salmon smolts as they encountered the facilities. The radio-tagged smolts passed the dam 9.5 h after release (median) and exhibited a dam-passage efficiency of 84%, with passage rates increasing with body length. Fish passage occurred through both the rack bypass and the nature-like fishway. The passage efficiencies were 70-95% for the rack bypass and 47% for the nature-like fisway. The new fish passage facilities resulted in improved passage conditions at the site, confirming that angled racks with bypasses as best-practise solutions for downstream passage, but also that large nature-like fishways may act as downstream passage routes for salmon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CSIRO , 2018. Vol. 69, no 12, p. 1894-1904
Keywords [en]
downstream passage, fish passage solution, migration, passage efficiency.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70349DOI: 10.1071/MF18065ISI: 000451437700011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85055562911OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70349DiVA, id: diva2:1266830
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved

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Nyqvist, DanielCalles, Olle

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