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Foregrounding ecojustice in conservation
Kensington Campus, Australia.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
International Business Management Studies, the Netherlands.
The Ecological Citizen, United Kingdom.
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2018 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 228, p. 367-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Justice for nature remains a confused term. In recent decades justice has predominantly been limited to humanity, with a strong focus on social justice, and its spin-off – environmental justice for people. We first examine the formal rationale for ecocentrism and ecological ethics, as this underpins attitudes towards justice for nature, and show how justice for nature has been affected by concerns about dualisms and by strong anthropocentric bias. We next consider the traditional meaning of social justice, alongside the recent move by some scholars to push justice for nature into social justice, effectively weakening any move to place ecojustice centre-stage. This, we argue, is both unethical and doomed to failure as a strategy to protect life on Earth. The dominant meaning of ‘environmental justice’ – in essence, justice for humans in regard to environmental issues – is also explored. We next discuss what ecological justice (ecojustice) is, and how academia has ignored it for many decades. The charge of ecojustice being ‘antihuman’ is refuted. We argue that distributive justice can also apply to nature, including an ethic of bio-proportionality, and also consider how to reconcile social justice and ecojustice, arguing that ecojustice must now be foregrounded to ensure effective conservation. After suggesting a ‘Framework for implementing ecojustice’ for conservation practitioners, we conclude by urging academia to foreground ecojustice. © 2018

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 228, p. 367-374
Keywords [en]
Ecological ethics, Ecological justice, Environmental justice, Intrinsic value, Social justice
National Category
Ethics Ecology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70264DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2018.09.011ISI: 000452815200039OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70264DiVA, id: diva2:1265154
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved

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Piccolo, John

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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