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Managing bullying in Swedish workplace settings: A concealed and only partially acknowledged problem
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9021-3426
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
University of Applied Sciences, Elverum.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The purpose of this article was to explore workplace routines and strategies for preventing and managing bullying in the context of health and elderly care. Background: Bullying is a serious problem in workplaces with consequences for the individual, the organisation and the quality of care. Method: Open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 participants, including managers and specialists within one hospital and three municipalities. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: Bullying was often concealed, due to avoidance, unclear definition and lack of direct strategies against bullying. No preventative work focusing on bullying existed. Psychosocial issues were not prioritized at workplace meetings. The supervisor had the formal responsibility to identify, manage and solve the bullying problem. The most common decision to solve the problem was to split the group. Conclusions: The findings showed that bullying was a concealed problem and was first acknowledged when the problem was acute. Implications for Nursing Management: Crucial strategies to prevent and combat bullying consist of acknowledgement of the problem, transformational leadership, prioritization of psycho-social issues, support of a humanistic value system and work through bullying problems to achieve long-term changes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2019. Vol. 27, p. 339-346
Keywords [en]
management, preventative work, solutions, workplace bullying, aged, article, avoidance behavior, bullying, clinical article, content analysis, elderly care, female, human, human experiment, interview, leadership, male, manager, nursing management, responsibility, workplace
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70245DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12668ISI: 000461576900014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054593876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70245DiVA, id: diva2:1265110
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved

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Strandmark K, MargarethaRahm, GullBrittRystedt, IngridWilde-Larsson, Bodil

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