Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Less means more: nutrient stress leads to higher delta N-15 ratios in fish
Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA. (NRRV)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5614-069x
Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA.
Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA.
2014 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1926-1931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Isotopic ratios of nitrogen are often used in food-web studies to determine trophic position (including food chain length) and food sources, with greater ratios of 15N/14N (d15N) usually considered indicative of higher trophic position. However, fasting and starving animals may also show a progressive increase in d15N over time as they catabolise their own tissues.

2. To determine the importance of starvation, we conducted a 4-month laboratory experiment testing effects of starvation on body condition and isotope ratios in the muscle tissue of freshwater guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We also compared laboratory results and conclusions with analyses of body condition and isotope ratios in various small species of fish collected in four seasons from the Kansas River in north-eastern Kansas, U.S.A.

3. Fish starved in our laboratory experiment had significantly higher 15N values and poorer body condition than those fed more regularly. The diverse group of fish species collected in summer (July) from the Kansas River had higher weight-to-length ratios and lower 15N values than those retrieved in other seasons. Overall body condition resulting from reduced food consumption explained 44 and 53% of the variability in 15N for field and laboratory fish, respectively.

4. These results are applicable to a wide variety of food-web research but are especially pertinent to studies of organisms that undergo large changes in life history, dormancy, extended fasts or periods of significant nutritional allocation to young.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1926-1931
Keywords [en]
Food chain length, nitrogen, starvation, trophic position
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69558DOI: 10.1111/fwb.12396ISI: 000339480500012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-69558DiVA, id: diva2:1254784
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Bowes, Rachel E.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bowes, Rachel E.
In the same journal
Freshwater Biology
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf