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Development of the distributed dislocation dipole technique for the analysis of closure of complex fractures involving kinks and branches
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1672-1235
Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
2018 (English)In: European journal of mechanics. A, Solids, ISSN 0997-7538, E-ISSN 1873-7285, Vol. 69, p. 168-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the development of the distributed dislocation dipole technique (DDDT) for the analysis of straight, kinked and branched cracks where parts of the cracks may close during loading. The method has been developed for plane problems. Crack cases in which closure occurs are analyzed by reformulating the Buecicner's principle, taking into account the contact stresses at the contacting portions of the crack surfaces. Stress intensity factors corresponding to opening and the in-plane sliding mode of deformation at the crack tips are computed. Several test cases involving straight, kinked and/or branched cracks where parts of the cracks undergoes crack surface closure when subjected to the outer loading are analyzed. The results obtained from the DDDT are compared to those obtained from a Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis of the same crack cases. This comparison shows that the computation of stress intensity factors for the cases involving crack surface closure are less accurate than those for fully open crack cases. However, for the cases under consideration, the stress intensity factors were still computed with a maximum difference of approximately 2 per cent compared to the FEM calculations if Jacobi polynomial expansions of at least the twelfth order were used to represent the crack surface opening and sliding displacements. In most cases under consideration, sixth order Jacobi polynomial expansions were sufficient to obtain results within that margin of deviation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 69, p. 168-178
National Category
Applied Mechanics Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67306DOI: 10.1016/j.euromechsol.2017.12.004ISI: 000430767100014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-67306DiVA, id: diva2:1205219
Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved

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Tofique, Muhammad WaqasHallbäck, Nils

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European journal of mechanics. A, Solids
Applied MechanicsTribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)

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