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Eye Gaze Patterns Associated with Aggressive Tendencies in Adolescence
Division of Psychiatry, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA.
Division of Psychiatry, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9739-7184
Division of Psychiatry, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA.
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2018 (English)In: Psychiatric quarterly, ISSN 0033-2720, E-ISSN 1573-6709, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Social information processing theory hypothesizes that aggressive children pay more attention to cues of hostility and threat in others’ behavior, consequently leading to over-interpretation of others’ behavior as hostile. While there is abundant evidence of aggressive children demonstrating hostile attribution biases, less well documented is whether such biases stem from over-attendance and hypersensitivity to hostile cues in social situations. Over-attendance to hostile cues would be typified by deviations at any stage of the multi-stage process of social information processing models. While deviations at later stages in social information processing models are associated with aggressive behavior in children, the initial step of encoding has historically been difficult to empirically measure, being a low level automatic process unsuitable for self-report. We employed eye-tracking methodologies to better understand the visual encoding of such social information. Eye movements of ten 13–18 year-old children referred from clinical and non-clinical populations were recorded in real time while the children viewed scenarios varying between hostile, non-hostile and ambiguous social provocation. In addition, the children completed a brief measure of risk of aggression. Aggressive children did attend more to the social scenarios with hostile cues, in particular attending longest to those hostile scenarios where the actor in the scenario had a congruent emotional response. These findings corroborate social information processing theory and the traditional bottom-up processing hypotheses that aggressive behavior relates to increased attention to hostile cues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. p. 1-10
Keyword [en]
Aggressive behavior, Eye-tracking, Social cognition, Social information processing, adolescence, adolescent, adult, animal experiment, animal model, article, attention, eye tracking, female, gaze, information processing, male, nonhuman, provocation, self report
National Category
Sociology Psychology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66907DOI: 10.1007/s11126-018-9573-8Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044027316OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-66907DiVA, id: diva2:1194927
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved

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