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Security officers responding to residential fire alarms: Estimating the effect on survival and property damage
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9667-2260
2018 (English)In: Fire safety journal, ISSN 0379-7112, E-ISSN 1873-7226, Vol. 97, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Decreasing the response time to residential fires leads to more people being saved, fewer injuries, less property damage and a lesser environmental impact. One way of reducing the response time to fires is to allow the municipal fire and rescue services to cooperate with other actors. This study evaluates a potential agreement between the fire and rescue service of a Swedish municipality (Helsingborg) and a private security officers' firm. A geographic information system (GIS) simulation is used to estimate the reduced response times. The result is combined with a statistically estimated measure of the risk of fatality for marginal changes in the response time to find the effect on survival rates and property damage. The results show that the response time is 52 s on average faster using security officers for residential fires. Combining this gain in response time with the relation to fatalities and adjusting for the fact that security officers are less effective imply a decreased death rate by 0.0105 or 1.3% per year. The project has positive economic effects with the benefits estimated to be 1.4 (saved lives) and respectively 2.3 (saved lives and property damage) times higher than the costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 97, p. 1-11
Keywords [en]
Community operational research, Cost benefit analysis, Residential fires, Response time, Simulation, Emergency services, Environmental impact, Fire protection, Fires, Housing, Response time (computer systems), Risk assessment, Risk perception, Death rates, Fire and rescue services, Operational research, Property damage, Security officers, Survival rate
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66544DOI: 10.1016/j.firesaf.2018.01.008ISI: 000435047400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-66544DiVA, id: diva2:1187136
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved

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Sund, BjörnJaldell, Henrik

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