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The shift in human health from infection-related diseases to chronic illnesses and the importance of indoor chemical exposure
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0417-1686
2018 (English)In: Indoor Air Pollution / [ed] Peter Pluschke, Hans Schleibinger, Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2018, 2, p. 109-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It has been recently estimated that the pattern of the global burden of diseases – expressed as disability-adjusted life years (DALY) – has changed over the last 20 years and a shift from communicable disorders to noncommunicable disorders has been observed. This shift is more pronounced in high-incomecountries. Even though there is lack of knowledge regarding the cause(s) behind the increase in chronic diseases/disorders, there are scientifically based suspicions that environmental factors do play an important role in interaction with genetic predisposition. Especially diffuse emissions of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from consumer products are a matter of concern. The four reasons for concern with human EDC exposure are: The low-dose effect and a non-monotonic dose-response relationshipEarly life sensitivity and the persistency of effectsThe large number of EDC sources in our daily lifeThe wide range of health effects A full chain model is proposed which is following chemicals from their sources over environmental exposures in food, air, and dust over to human uptake and finally to human health effects. The model also includes modifying factors for environmental exposures, different pathways for human uptake, and biological mechanisms involved in health effects. With scientific information in this model risk management should be possible and result in preventive actions in order to reduce children’s exposure to health relevant factors. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2018, 2. p. 109-123
Series
The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, ISSN 1867-979X ; 64
Keywords [en]
Bisphenol A, Chronic disorders, Consumer products, Endocrine disrupting chemicals, Indoor chemical exposure, Phthalates
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66402DOI: 10.1007/698_2014_256Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85041341350ISBN: 978-3-662-56063-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-66402DiVA, id: diva2:1183403
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved

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Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf

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