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Experience of data collection in support of the assessment of global progress in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030-A Swedish pilot study
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 24, p. 144-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most countries collect loss and damage data after disasters for learning purposes and in support of future preventive work. The lack of international standards and sharing principles implies heterogeneous data sets, thus presenting a challenge to the development of indicators intended to assess progress within the UN agreement Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (SFDRR). In this study, data on mortality, affected people and direct economic losses are extracted from two national databases in Sweden for the years 1996-2015. Pre-SFDRR terminology, definitions and different inclusion criteria are used to exemplify and identify challenges when global "proxy" data inquiry clashes with sub-national demands for data quality. Different test methods on how to estimate affected people are used and in comparison with the term 'directly affected people', as proposed in the SFDRR indicator establishment process, it is concluded that methods for more disaggregated data are needed. In a Swedish context, the SFDRR call for a reference period 2005-2015 is found to be a time too short for providing a fair picture of disaster risks within Sweden's borders. The nationally developed strategy in Sweden, as in many other countries, to learn in-depth after each new disaster and use the experience to remedy weaknesses in safety systems, generates solid data supporting the development of SFDRR indicators, but the national benefits and the relevance of statistics from disasters re-occurring on longer time scales are limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 24, p. 144-150
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65898DOI: 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2017.06.008ISI: 000413936100017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-65898DiVA, id: diva2:1177552
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, Magnus

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf