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A bricolage perspective on service innovation
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Linköpings universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6589-8662
AWAG, Dubendorf, Switzerland.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2933-244X
Univ Turku, Turku Sch Econ, Turku, Finland.
Univ Namur, Namur, Belgium.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 79, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Service innovation is often viewed as a process of accessing the necessary resources, (re)combining them, and converting them into new services. The current knowledge on success factors for service innovation, such as formalized new service development (NSD) processes, predominantly comes from studying large firms with a relatively stable resource base. However, this neglect situations in which organizations face severe resource constraints. This paper argues that under such constraints, a formalized new service development process could be counter-productive and a bricolage perspective might better explain service innovation in resource constrained environments. In this conceptual paper, we propose that four critical bricolage capabilities (addressing resource scarcity actively, making do with what is available, improvising when recombining resources, and networking with external partners) influence service innovation outcomes. Empirical illustrations from five organizations substantiate our conceptual development. Our discussion leads to a framework and four testable propositions that can guide further service research. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 79, p. 290-298
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65722DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.03.021ISI: 000406983600028OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-65722DiVA, id: diva2:1175667
Available from: 2018-01-18 Created: 2018-01-18 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

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Witell, Lars

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