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A TEXTILE WEB: Jewish immigrants in Gothenburg in the early nineteenth century and their impact on the textile market
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Hist Studies, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 485-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The 1830s has been singled out as the decade in which the Swedish consumer market really started to expand. In the same period, cotton textile production expanded in the Gothenburg area. A small group of immigrant Jewish families played an important role in this development. The impact of Jewish merchants on the growth of the consumer goods market is consistent with international research. Their entrepreneurial activities and renewal of textile production and trade have been emphasized. This has, however, not been paid much attention to in the Swedish research. This article discusses what impact the Jewish immigrants had on the increase of the textile market in Gothenburg and its surroundings. Through a couple of case studies and examples, we want to elucidate the significance of Jewish textile production and trade: Jewish calico printers started up mass production of fashionable fabrics in the 1820s. Furthermore, Jewish merchants spread their goods to customers in the countryside in cooperation with Swedish pedlars. The authors also discuss different reasons why the Jews played such a significant role during this particular period: The role of the legislation, the Jewish textile tradition, access to capital, networks, effective distribution, a growing consumer demand, and the geographical context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxfordshire: Routledge, 2015. Vol. 40, no 4, p. 485-511
Keywords [en]
textiles, Jewish immigration, 19th-century Sweden
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64131DOI: 10.1080/03468755.2015.1058855ISI: 000359729400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-64131DiVA, id: diva2:1144815
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf