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Resourceful Indigenous families of children with autism
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9637-5338
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a research project involving five First Nations families in British Columbia, Canada, with a child diagnosed with autism, it became apparent that autism support and diagnosis services can be difficult to access. In a pilot conversation, an Indigenous family in Australia revealed similar issues. To ensure care for their children, these families have to be creative and resourceful.

The aim of this presentation is present how two First Nations families acquire services, or provide care for their child when services are not available. Furthermore, an Indigenous, Australian medical doctor and mother of a child with autism, will tell about their struggle for appropriate services and support, and present the kit she has developed.

The research project used a pan-tribal framework. To address power issues and to reflect the reciprocal relationality in Indigenous worldviews, the term research partner is used instead of participant and conversation is used instead of interview. Other methods such as observations, video-filmed observations, intuition and dream were also used.

Access to services and support varies depending on living location. Results show that the First Nations families tend to their child’s needs in different ways, such as inclusively within a multi-generational family, and accessing services through autism funding are ways that First Nations families. The Australian family relocated to access services and support, and constructed a learning kit.

Resourcefulness is essential to all families with a member diagnosed with autism when community services and support systems fail to adequately serve their needs. However, for Indigenous families, the Western deficit model is not compatible with the inclusive, reciprocal worldviews. For them, their resourcefulness may be all they have to work with. Future research should address this gap between needs and support, and address cultural sensitivity and appropriateness.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63807OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-63807DiVA: diva2:1142376
Conference
Asia Pacific Autism Conference 2017
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-09-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf