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ICT in South African townships - a means for women of small enterprises to run their business more efficiently?
2004 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The Internet is often told to be a global phenomenon but by studying how it is spread around the world it could definitely be questioned. There are several reasons for the low spreading in developing countries and some of the reasons are deficient infrastructure, high costs, lack of equipment and political decisions. Life is not easy for the residents in the townships around Cape Town. With no social security safety net, the unemployment rate is about 50 % and the unemployed have to create their own incomes through business development. We aim to describe if and how ICTs (information and communication technologies) could support women entrepreneurs who run their own small businesses, in South African townships, and the problem definition is: How could ICTs support women with small businesses in South African townships? Based on this problem definition four different question areas have been identified in association with the analysis frame that the Centre for HumanIT has drawn up within the research programme ‘Bridging the Digital Divide’. The Question Areas are: Information flow, Information need, Existing means of information transference, and Economical aspects of ICT use. For our qualitative survey we chose a hermeneutic method and we have principally used two different ways of collection data, literature studies and in-depth interviews. We conducted four in-depth interviews with different small enterprises in the townships of Khayelitsha, Langa and Gugulethu. The enterprises were one Craft Market, two different Bed & Breakfasts, and one Shuttle Service. ICTs could support women with their own small businesses in townships in many ways according to many authors, and it is something that we have noticed ourselves in our interviews. A condition for the women entrepreneurs to be able to benefit from ICTs is that they have knowledge enough to use the different tools. We found five answers to the question how ICTs could support women with small businesses in townships. We found them by using the question areas where we have categorised the information obtained in the interviews and observations made. The answers are that ICTs enable and facilitate communication, marketing, administration and information searching. Finally ICTs, when used in the best way possible, could lead to increased independence/control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. , 66 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-56317Local ID: INF D-5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-56317DiVA: diva2:1116498
Subject / course
Information Systems
Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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