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Realising the Kyoto protocol - an assessment of Germanys climate policy
2003 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Germany appears to be one of the few industrialized countries which are on track to fulfill the targets defined in the Kyoto Protocol in 1997. The EU-internal “burden sharing” requires that Germany reduces its greenhouse gas emissions by 21% till the period 2008 to 2012 (base year 1990). In the national climate policy program of October 2000 Germany even commits itself to decrease the six “Kyoto gases” (CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs = hydrofluorocarbons, SF6 = sulphur hexafluoride and PFCs = perfluorocarbons) by 40% till the year 2020. The German government has undertaken several efforts to achieve the Kyoto targets and has been quite successful so far. One has to admit that Germany has benefited a lot from the so-called “wall-fall profits”, meaning the breakdown and restructuring of the East German economy after reunification in 1990. But on the other hand, various efficient measures at national, regional and local levels were introduced in the 1990s. At the local level, the information campaign “Aktion Klimaschutz”, which is still in its infancy, could make a considerable contribution to an effective climate protective behavior of every energy consumer, what is gone into further by means of the case study. There have been different assessments to what extent the observed reductions are wall-fall profits, and to what extent they are the result of policy measures. It is now estimated that wall-fall profits account for almost 50% of the reduction of all six greenhouse gases. The contribution of all the policies combined is slightly higher, beyond 50%. The upcoming nuclear phase-out and the refusal of some important economic sectors to reduce their emissions make Germany’s chance to achieve the very ambitious national target without additional policy efforts seem rather slim.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. , 31 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-54445Local ID: MIV C-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-54445DiVA: diva2:1103173
Subject / course
Environmental Science
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30

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  • apa
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