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A central Oregon coastline - a strik-dip studie on the basalt headlands plus coverage of the coastlines morphology and factors effecting rates of erosion
2001 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The portion of the central Oregon Coast stretching from Maxwell Point in the north to Cape Foulweather in the south is divided into a series of littoral cells. The littoral cells are separated naturally from one another in the north and south by geologic borders which are known commonly as basalt headlands. The basalt making up the borders is hard, erosion- resistant material which came from lava flows during the Oligocene, Eocene, and Miocene. The material within the cells is composed mainly of sand dunes and coastal marine terrace. These materials erode faster than the basalt. Because of this difference in rates of erosion the present-day appearance of the coastline has evolved. Erosion studies along the Oregon coast have typically been done on the material within the littoral cells. It is there that the majority of the people live and it is also there that the greatest risk to life and property occurs. Extensive studies done by DOGAMI (Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries) are invaluable for determining the at risk areas. Erosion studies on the basalt have typically been few and inconclusive. The strike-dip study done on the basalt for this report does not intend to determine the rates of erosion on the basalt. Instead its purpose is to shed some light on what stage in their erosion the different headlands might be. It also intends to determine if the different types of basalt in the study area have fractured differently, or if the same headland is fractured differently depending on the directional exposure. The findings reveal that most of the basalt in the study area is very weathered. Strikes and dips generally run in all directions and the Schmidt-net graphs show very chaotic crack patterns. Depoe Bay basalt is an exception to this rule. The study’s findings also show that the frontal/ocean facing exposure is more chaotically cracked and subsequently more vulnerable to furthered erosion than the southern or northern exposures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 60 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53975Local ID: GEO C-6OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53975DiVA: diva2:1102535
Subject / course
Geography
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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