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Questions in conversation - a study based on the drama series “Emmerdale” and “Party of five”
2001 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The main goal of this paper was not only to investigate various types of questions used in speech, but also to find out whether there are certain factors, such as gender and culture, that effect what type of questions is uttered and what function it has. As a basis for the study, two drama series, Emmerdale and Party of Five were used to investigate the questions and their responses. All questions found were divided according to type, namely whether they were open-ended or closed questions. After this was done the data was also categorized into two different functions of questions, namely information-seeking questions and conversational questions. The results showed that the women in the series tended to use more questions than the men did, although in Emmerdale the difference was not great enough to draw any conclusions from. The Study also showed that the women in both series used conversational questions to a greater extent than the men did. Moreover, the study examined the possibility of correlation between type of questions and functions of questions. The trend seemed to be that while information-seeking questions tended to be open rather than closed, conversational questions had a tendancy to be closed rather than open. Finally, cultural differences were also investigated, which lead to the conclusion that there was a higher frequency of questions in the English series than in the American one.

Abstract [en]

The main goal of this paper was not only to investigate various types of questions used in speech, but also to find out whether there are certain factors, such as gender and culture, that effect what type of questions is uttered and what function it has. As a basis for the study, two drama series, Emmerdale and Party of Five were used to investigate the questions and their responses. All questions found were divided according to type, namely whether they were open-ended or closed questions. After this was done the data was also categorized into two different functions of questions, namely information-seeking questions and conversational questions. The results showed that the women in the series tended to use more questions than the men did, although in Emmerdale the difference was not great enough to draw any conclusions from. The Study also showed that the women in both series used conversational questions to a greater extent than the men did. Moreover, the study examined the possibility of correlation between type of questions and functions of questions. The trend seemed to be that while information-seeking questions tended to be open rather than closed, conversational questions had a tendancy to be closed rather than open. Finally, cultural differences were also investigated, which lead to the conclusion that there was a higher frequency of questions in the English series than in the American one.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 26 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53967Local ID: ENG D-9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53967DiVA: diva2:1102527
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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