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A comparive study of names, food and adaptations in Astrid Lindgrens book Madicken and an English-American translation
2000 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper was to investigate the translation of the Swedish original Madicken into the American-English version and to study how the translator has dealt with different types of names and names of food. Part of the aim was also to investigate the different adaptations in the same way. The method used consists of three steps. The first step was to select the three categories: names, food and adaptations. The second step was to compare these three categories in the original with the American version. The third step was to find out how the translated version differed from the original. Concerning the names, I found that the translation is rather close to the original. In most cases the translator adapts the names and they are adapted just sufficiently to fit the rules of the target language. For example there is the name Isidor in the Swedish original, in the American version this name is spelled Isidore. In those cases where changes are made, they have been made because there are no corresponding names in the target language. One example of this may be Madicken. This name could not possibly have been adapted because this is not even a real Swedish name. Therefore the translator had to find another name, in this case Maggie and Meg. The food, on the other hand, has been put through some inaccurate changes. It seems as if the translator does not want to complicate things for the reader by using words they do not know. He practices this procedure even though the result is not the most precise translation. For example, he constantly uses the English word pudding to translate the Swedish word fruktkräm. An explanation for this choice may be that the English-speaking population eats pudding to the same extent as the Swedes eat fruit-cream. Most of the adaptations seem to have been made to purify the text. Sentences and paragraphs that may frighten children or make them question adults’ authority are consistently omitted. If the adults have bad characters in the Swedish original these are not kept in the English version. Instead grown-ups are described as if they are perfect and their bad characters are changed or omitted. The same happens to children who do not behave properly, their behaviour is changed into make them appear obedient and their manners become very respectful. A field of interest for further studies may be to compare the original Madicken with the English-American translation and the British-English translation? Are there any differences between these two translations? What are they? Further, it would be interesting to compare different translations with each other. When translating Madicken into for example Chinese, does the translator use the Swedish original or another version? It would be an interesting topic to investigate changes and adaptations in the different versions, concerning issues such as cultural specifics, customs, food, and names.

Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper was to investigate the translation of the Swedish original Madicken into the American-English version and to study how the translator has dealt with different types of names and names of food. Part of the aim was also to investigate the different adaptations in the same way. The method used consists of three steps. The first step was to select the three categories: names, food and adaptations. The second step was to compare these three categories in the original with the American version. The third step was to find out how the translated version differed from the original. Concerning the names, I found that the translation is rather close to the original. In most cases the translator adapts the names and they are adapted just sufficiently to fit the rules of the target language. For example there is the name Isidor in the Swedish original, in the American version this name is spelled Isidore. In those cases where changes are made, they have been made because there are no corresponding names in the target language. One example of this may be Madicken. This name could not possibly have been adapted because this is not even a real Swedish name. Therefore the translator had to find another name, in this case Maggie and Meg. The food, on the other hand, has been put through some inaccurate changes. It seems as if the translator does not want to complicate things for the reader by using words they do not know. He practices this procedure even though the result is not the most precise translation. For example, he constantly uses the English word pudding to translate the Swedish word fruktkräm. An explanation for this choice may be that the English-speaking population eats pudding to the same extent as the Swedes eat fruit-cream._x000B__x000B_Most of the adaptations seem to have been made to purify the text. Sentences and paragraphs that may frighten children or make them question adults’ authority are consistently omitted. If the adults have bad characters in the Swedish original these are not kept in the English version. Instead grown-ups are described as if they are perfect and their bad characters are changed or omitted. The same happens to children who do not behave properly, their behaviour is changed into make them appear obedient and their manners become very respectful. A field of interest for further studies may be to compare the original Madicken with the English-American translation and the British-English translation? Are there any differences between these two translations? What are they? Further, it would be interesting to compare different translations with each other. When translating Madicken into for example Chinese, does the translator use the Swedish original or another version? It would be an interesting topic to investigate changes and adaptations in the different versions, concerning issues such as cultural specifics, customs, food, and names.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. , 37 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53962Local ID: ENG D-9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53962DiVA: diva2:1102522
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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