Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
From victims to role models - oppression and independence in Alice Walkers The Color Purple
2006 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The purpose with this essay is to examine patriarchal gender and racial oppression in The Color Purple. Through a womanist perspective, the study investigates black, female oppression as well as the possibility of independence through role models and female support. In the novel, black women are expected to adhere to specific gender and racial roles. A confining role that they occupy in the white and black community is that of mothers. Since they are regarded as mothers, their place is in the domestic domain. As mothers, they are also expected to be submissive, obedient and quiet. Unspoken norms require women to be pure and innocent, while at the same time they are regarded as sexual objects and often become victims of sexual assault. Life for a black woman also entails severe physical and mental abuse. Mental abuse results in internalizing of values and the women believe that they are only mothers and maids. Women also uphold patriarchal values and discriminate against each other. Because they live in a racist society, blacks also internalize a belief in racist superiority and men imitate their former slave owners by denying women their biological roots as well as disapprove of those with darker skin. Despite all the hardship, the women triumph by joining together. Through female support can they defy the system where they are treated as properties of exchange. They also revise and remove the limitations on motherhood. Even new roles are created, as the women become each other’s teachers and protectors. Another way to resist patriarchal oppression is by becoming role models. As role models, they learn that they do not have to adhere to the role as submissive victim. Having a mentally stronger woman to look up to allows more subjugated women to love their bodies as well as establish an identity through art and spirituality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. , 25 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53918Local ID: ENG D-15OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53918DiVA: diva2:1102478
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf