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And these days it is worse, with the poverty of blackness on one side and the weight of womanhood on other - patriarchal and colonial power in Tsitsi Dangarembgas Nervous conditions
2004 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this essay is to explore the issues of colonial power and indigenous patriarchal power in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions. In particular, the issue of education is examined and discussed. The novel begins by the main character’s, Tambudzai’s, assertion that she is not sorry when her brother, Nhamo, dies. It is indeed a shocking statement but when we as readers find out that Tambudzai cannot even dream of getting an education until her brother’s death then things start to make sense. As Tambudzai says the novel is not at all about death but about lives of four women whom she loves, but also of their men. Tambudzai elicits for us how women in the novel are doubly oppressed, firstly by the patriarchal society they live in and, secondly, by the colonialism. What is more, the novel also shows that even African males are not free. This essay explores the different ways of oppression in the novel and focuses to a great deal on patriarchal power. What is noteworthy is that patriarchy and colonialism affect each other, but it should not be forgotten that without the colonialism there would be no education at all to speak of. The novel shows that there are different ways of resisting these oppressive powers but education is the only way that can give a person permanent freedom and independence, as shown by two women in the novel, Tambudzai and Lucia. Furthermore, in resisting indigenous patriarchal power and colonial power it is significant to know one’s own history and to have a stable background. But one must also have the awareness of the system that oppresses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. , 29 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53903Local ID: ENG D-14OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53903DiVA: diva2:1102463
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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