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The proof of the pudding is in the reading - a corpus investigation of food idioms
2002 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Why do people use idioms? I would suggest that idiomatic expressions could function as an abbreviation to shorten the opinion or situation they express. Hence, an utterance can be short and often humorous when using an idiom instead of a longer and perhaps more complicated way of expressing yourself. The idioms used in Great Britain can also be quite down to earth, illustrating the reality of life. The set of idioms varies from country to country and the inhabitants of that particular country generally understand it but foreigners can misunderstand a phrase since idioms can be ambiguous. The ambiguity, reality and humour in food idioms such as: one’s bread and butter, piece of cake, bear fruit and to make mincemeat of someone interest me. I will investigate if they occur in newspapers like The Guardian and The Observer and in what area if they do occur. Examples will be retrieved from a corpus of the papers mentioned above. The areas that will be examined are the sports, political and the business sections. Moreover, the level of formality might play a role in which section an idiom occurs and a comparison will be done to examine if there are sections in which informal idiomatic phrases occur in greater numbers than in other sections.

Abstract [en]

Why do people use idioms? I would suggest that idiomatic expressions could function as an abbreviation to shorten the opinion or situation they express. Hence, an utterance can be short and often humorous when using an idiom instead of a longer and perhaps more complicated way of expressing yourself. The idioms used in Great Britain can also be quite down to earth, illustrating the reality of life. The set of idioms varies from country to country and the inhabitants of that particular country generally understand it but foreigners can misunderstand a phrase since idioms can be ambiguous. The ambiguity, reality and humour in food idioms such as: one’s bread and butter, piece of cake, bear fruit and to make mincemeat of someone interest me. I will investigate if they occur in newspapers like The Guardian and The Observer and in what area if they do occur. Examples will be retrieved from a corpus of the papers mentioned above. The areas that will be examined are the sports, political and the business sections. Moreover, the level of formality might play a role in which section an idiom occurs and a comparison will be done to examine if there are sections in which informal idiomatic phrases occur in greater numbers than in other sections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. , 29 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53881Local ID: ENG D-12OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53881DiVA: diva2:1102441
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf