Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Socioeconomic structures and emotional processes in Wuthering Heights (Bronte)
2001 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Wuthering Heights is a popular novel. Since its publication in 1847 it has been subjected to criticism of all turns. The focus of this essay is on the relationship between the socioeconomic and emotional processes pertaining to the main protagonists of the story. The essay puts forth the role of Catherine Earnshaw´s idealistic motivation for marrying Edgar Linton in order to aid Heathcliff financially and socially. Catherine´s motivation is a result of the basically materialistic thematic of the novel, and it comes through as explicitly stated in one of her speeches. Whereas her intention does prove successful, since her marriage actually furthers Heathcliff´s social and financial ascent, it nevertheless causes a split between her and Heathcliff. In consenting to Edgar Linton this effect of her decision is a matter totally overlooked by her. The relationship between, on the one hand, the emotional and physical unity desired by her and Heathcliff alike and, on the other hand, the separation between them, is shown to partake in a sway due to material and economic matters. These economic conditions also create a shifting of influence and power between the characters. Such matters being dependent on the laws of the times, disfavour the personal independence of Catherine as a married woman, another fact not duly acknowledged by her. In spite of the materialistically successful consequences of Catherine´s marriage, in the end the emotional effects of the separation between her and Heathcliff prove disastrous and fatal for both of them.

Abstract [en]

Wuthering Heights is a popular novel. Since its publication in 1847 it has been subjected to criticism of all turns. The focus of this essay is on the relationship between the socioeconomic and emotional processes pertaining to the main protagonists of the story. The essay puts forth the role of Catherine Earnshaw´s idealistic motivation for marrying Edgar Linton in order to aid Heathcliff financially and socially. Catherine´s motivation is a result of the basically materialistic thematic of the novel, and it comes through as explicitly stated in one of her speeches. Whereas her intention does prove successful, since her marriage actually furthers Heathcliff´s social and financial ascent, it nevertheless causes a split between her and Heathcliff. In consenting to Edgar Linton this effect of her decision is a matter totally overlooked by her. The relationship between, on the one hand, the emotional and physical unity desired by her and Heathcliff alike and, on the other hand, the separation between them, is shown to partake in a sway due to material and economic matters. These economic conditions also create a shifting of influence and power between the characters. Such matters being dependent on the laws of the times, disfavour the personal independence of Catherine as a married woman, another fact not duly acknowledged by her. In spite of the materialistically successful consequences of Catherine´s marriage, in the end the emotional effects of the separation between her and Heathcliff prove disastrous and fatal for both of them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 29 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53865Local ID: ENG D-11OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53865DiVA: diva2:1102425
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf