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Female vs male language - a comparative study of discourse particles in TV-shows
2001 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Gender is an important division in all societies. Especially today when feminism has become so influential and discrimination is always on the agenda. Being born male or female has far-reaching consequences for an individual. It affects, on the one hand, how we act in the world and, on the other hand, how the world treats us. The aim of this paper was to try and see if the discourse particles, found by Lakoff and other linguists, do function in the way they described when it comes to the actual use by men and women. In order to investigate this I tried to apply these earlier studies on discourse particles in TV-shows. My background research shows that the use of the most common discourse particles vary between women and men, for instance, tag questions, minimal responses, modals and body language. For example, women tend to use the modal construction more often than men. To summarize, the results of this d-paper were not that different from what had been found earlier. It can be questioned whether TV-shows show reality or not and so forth. However, it is interesting to be aware of the fact that women and men use language differently and that we can learn from this in the way that women, for instance, can become better at giving direct orders instead of using the modal construction and men can become better listeners by learning how to give feedback. If women and men in their relationships learn to be aware of their language differences, they will be able to run a conversation more smoothly.

Abstract [en]

Gender is an important division in all societies. Especially today when feminism has become so influential and discrimination is always on the agenda. Being born male or female has far-reaching consequences for an individual. It affects, on the one hand, how we act in the world and, on the other hand, how the world treats us. The aim of this paper was to try and see if the discourse particles, found by Lakoff and other linguists, do function in the way they described when it comes to the actual use by men and women. In order to investigate this I tried to apply these earlier studies on discourse particles in TV-shows. My background research shows that the use of the most common discourse particles vary between women and men, for instance, tag questions, minimal responses, modals and body language. For example, women tend to use the modal construction more often than men. To summarize, the results of this d-paper were not that different from what had been found earlier. It can be questioned whether TV-shows show reality or not and so forth. However, it is interesting to be aware of the fact that women and men use language differently and that we can learn from this in the way that women, for instance, can become better at giving direct orders instead of using the modal construction and men can become better listeners by learning how to give feedback. If women and men in their relationships learn to be aware of their language differences, they will be able to run a conversation more smoothly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 37 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53863Local ID: ENG D-11OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53863DiVA: diva2:1102423
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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