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Hierarchial structure in “Lord of the flies” (Golding)
2001 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this essay is to examine how Golding is using a well known, hierarchical structure to emphasize and give topical interest to a phenomenon which repeatedly arise in the world, i.e. evil in society. The world of the children on the island becomes a reflection of the adult world, which, from the children’s point of view, serves as a norm in their lives, a way of living which they want to adopt – some more than others. What they do adopt very quickly is the hierarchical thinking which has dominated the Western world in modern time. Extra attention is given to three main characters in the novel: Ralph, Jack and Piggy and how the hierarchical system affects them on the island. A division is made between the democratic society on the island, which is run by Ralph, and the despotic society run by Jack. The despotic society is where the hierarchy is most evident and also most brutal. In order to secure its own survival, the despotic society completely demolishes the democratic. The hierarchical system is important to both Ralph’s democratic, and Jack’s despotic, society although the long-lasting consequences of their rule differ. Important to this essay is that neither society survive on the island something which is not dependant on the fact that the people on the island are children This is clearly emphasized by Golding with the appearance of the naval officer. The naval officer also emphasizes the message of the novel as a whole. Golding gives the reader a general message concerning the whole world and all ages, and the hierarchical structure is an important part of both the world at large and the world on the island.

Abstract [en]

The purpose of this essay is to examine how Golding is using a well known, hierarchical structure to emphasize and give topical interest to a phenomenon which repeatedly arise in the world, i.e. evil in society. The world of the children on the island becomes a reflection of the adult world, which, from the children’s point of view, serves as a norm in their lives, a way of living which they want to adopt – some more than others. What they do adopt very quickly is the hierarchical thinking which has dominated the Western world in modern time. Extra attention is given to three main characters in the novel: Ralph, Jack and Piggy and how the hierarchical system affects them on the island. A division is made between the democratic society on the island, which is run by Ralph, and the despotic society run by Jack. The despotic society is where the hierarchy is most evident and also most brutal. In order to secure its own survival, the despotic society completely demolishes the democratic. The hierarchical system is important to both Ralph’s democratic, and Jack’s despotic, society although the long-lasting consequences of their rule differ. Important to this essay is that neither society survive on the island something which is not dependant on the fact that the people on the island are children This is clearly emphasized by Golding with the appearance of the naval officer. The naval officer also emphasizes the message of the novel as a whole. Golding gives the reader a general message concerning the whole world and all ages, and the hierarchical structure is an important part of both the world at large and the world on the island.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 25 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53852Local ID: ENG D-10OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53852DiVA: diva2:1102412
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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