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Archetypes as allegory in “Whats bred in the bone” (Robertson Davies)
2001 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to show how the author Robertson Davies has used the theories of C.G Jung in developing the characters in his novel What’s Bred in the Bone. The central Character of the novel is Francis Cornish whose life the author offers unique insight in. The reader is allowed to follow the development of Francis as an individual from before his birth, since events before his birth becomes a great influence in Francis life, to his death. The basic structure for Cornish’s development to a position as a world famous expert of art is Jung’s concept of the individuation process. The author has used this theory and let the different characters surrounding Francis represent the different archetypal images of the individuation. The novel is si biographical in its style, since its major concern is following one single character through life. in order to make the biographical facts more certain, the author introduces two celestial characters as narrators in the story; the recording angel and Francis private Daimon Maimas. These two omniscient narrators work not only as a guarantee for the truthfulness of the biographical details, but also highlights certain passages in the novel that are important in the development of Francis by discussing them among themselves. Thus the author has made sure that the intended message of the novel is safely delivered even to the inattentive reader. The author seem to fear that the theories of Jung are unknown to his readers, and as he lets the life of Francis become an allegory of individuation he wants to make sure that the message reaches the reader. This narrative construction however, results in tedious lectures where the reader becomes very much aware of the author’s presence in the angelic discussions. Obviously the author has been willing to take the risk to annoy his readers in order to make sure that they recognise the life of Francis Cornish as an allegory of human development.

Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to show how the author Robertson Davies has used the theories of C.G Jung in developing the characters in his novel What’s Bred in the Bone. The central Character of the novel is Francis Cornish whose life the author offers unique insight in. The reader is allowed to follow the development of Francis as an individual from before his birth, since events before his birth becomes a great influence in Francis life, to his death. The basic structure for Cornish’s development to a position as a world famous expert of art is Jung’s concept of the individuation process. The author has used this theory and let the different characters surrounding Francis represent the different archetypal images of the individuation. The novel is si biographical in its style, since its major concern is following one single character through life. in order to make the biographical facts more certain, the author introduces two celestial characters as narrators in the story; the recording angel and Francis private Daimon Maimas. These two omniscient narrators work not only as a guarantee for the truthfulness of the biographical details, but also highlights certain passages in the novel that are important in the development of Francis by discussing them among themselves. Thus the author has made sure that the intended message of the novel is safely delivered even to the inattentive reader. The author seem to fear that the theories of Jung are unknown to his readers, and as he lets the life of Francis become an allegory of individuation he wants to make sure that the message reaches the reader. This narrative construction however, results in tedious lectures where the reader becomes very much aware of the author’s presence in the angelic discussions. Obviously the author has been willing to take the risk to annoy his readers in order to make sure that they recognise the life of Francis Cornish as an allegory of human development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 35 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53848Local ID: ENG D-10OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53848DiVA: diva2:1102408
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
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