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Swear words in British films - an investigation of the use of swear words in three British romantic comedies
2004 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

When sound first appeared in motion pictures in 1927, the Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (MPPDA) offered some guidelines for which words should not be used or should be handled carefully in the making of films. These banned words were: god, lord, jesus, christ, hell, damn, gawd , ”and every other profane and vulgar expression however it may be spelled.” Most of us are familiar with American films and the way that they use or don’t use swear words, but most of us are probably not as familiar with the use of swear words in British films. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to make the use of swear words in British films more known, both to myself as well as to the readers of this paper. In doing so, I investigated the use of swear words in three romantic comedies (Bridget Jones’s Diary, About a Boy, and Love Actually), who used them, which ones were used, and why they were being used. The results of my investigation showed that the head characters in two of the films (Bridget Jones’s Diary and About a Boy) used swear words most frequently, with no regard to their sex. However, in the third film (Love Actually) there were no real head characters and a mix of female and male characters, but still the male characters swore much more than the female characters did. Some of the most frequently used swear words in the films were: fuck, bugger, bloody, arse, god and hell. The most important reason for using swear words was a linguistical motive. Nyckelord: swearing, bad language, film.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. , 24 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53778Local ID: ENG C-17OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53778DiVA: diva2:1102338
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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  • apa
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