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Special linguistic characteristics and language change in Internet relay chat
2003 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

During the last two decades, the Western world has become dominated by technology. In this computerised society the Internet has opened new ways of communicating with others. This kind of electronically based communication, which is called Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) makes it possible to create new personal relationships with individuals from all parts of the world. CMC is a wide term that can be subdivided into a whole spectrum of different types of communications, for example Internet Relay Chat (IRC). By taking a closer look at previous research carried out on the language used in IRC one is able to see that this language has grown into a style of its own. Therefore, the aim in this paper was to investigate the typical characteristics of the language in IRC and the methods used to simulate face-to-face communication. The reason for this was to find out if the language has changed over the past five years. The investigation is based on conversations from various mIRC channels, and a comparison of the results was made with those presented in the unpublished term paper "Internet Relay Chat: Creative Methods to Maintain Rapid Discourse and Simulate Face-to-Face Interaction" (Pihlgren 1998). The results of this investigation show that the special characteristics of the language in IRC are changes in vocabulary, spelling and grammar, as well as omission of punctuation. In comparison with the study made in 1998, these results show that the language has not changed much over the past five years. In fact, the linguistic cues set by the early users still exist in IRC and seem to be deeply rooted in the community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. , 31 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53727Local ID: ENG C-15OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53727DiVA: diva2:1102287
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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  • apa
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