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Some gender differences in language usage
2003 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

There are differences in how men and women use language. This has been established by much research during the last century; however, according to previous studies, the differences are not as great as it is commonly believed. It is also evident that even if some of the common beliefs on language differences are true, many of them are only prejudices and stereotypes. In fact, in some cases, it is the opposite of the common belief that really is the case. The aim of this paper is to find out whether or not there seem to be a difference in the language use of men and women, and wherein this difference lies. My own study will focus on eight interviews from two different television shows where the hosts try to maintain a relaxed and informal atmosphere. The features studied were hedges, boosters, verbal fillers, interruptions, questions and compliments, all of which were found to differ between men and women in previous research. It is the frequency of these language features that is the focus of the present study, and no claims are made as to their usage in different contexts, or the varying conversational function of these items. The results show that there are some differences in language use between the genders, but that these differences are not so great. With some of the features, e.g. the number of times each type of question is asked, the results are very similar when seen from a gender perspective. Other features, like verbal fillers and hedges, were used more by the female guests, while the men spoke more and interrupted more times than the women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. , 27 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53726Local ID: ENG C-15OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53726DiVA: diva2:1102286
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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  • apa
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