Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Logos, Pathos and Ethos in four american presidents famous speeches
2003 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The power of words pervades our lives daily - through newspapers, magazines, advertising, speeches and essays. Strong vocabulary cannot do without effective rhetorical techniques though: the way words are exploited and manipulated in their meaning and associations definitely plays an important role in how we understand them. Public speakers make extensive use of linguistic strategies to heighten the listeners’ receptivity to their messages. Persuasion is indeed an orator’s ultimate motivation Politicians in particular capitalize on language as a persuasive tool of communication, in order to alter people’s beliefs and attitudes as well as to move them to action. This manipulation is achieved by the employment of compelling and eloquent devices that appeal to the logical (logos), emotional (pathos) and ethical (ethos) senses of the audience. In this paper, I explore four of history’s most acclaimed and cited speeches delivered by American presidents, with a time interval of approximately 20 years between each, from 1941 to 2001. All four speeches were conceived during war, cold war or post cold war terrorism-struck periods. This paper investigates the most prominent words and themes broached in each example of this particular genre of discourse (war rhetoric) and tries to establish a parallel between the speeches and their recurrent features. To do this, I will primarily apply the Aristotelian study of rhetoric – based on the three classical means of persuasion mentioned – and interrelate it with Maslow’s findings about human needs. Is it possible to identify common strategies to evoke ethos, pathos and logos in the texts? If so, can these strategies be categorized into a paradigm? Are logos, ethos and pathos equally used or is there any prevailing rhetorical appeal? This investigation is based upon Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 3rd inaugural from 1941, John F. Kennedy’s inaugural from 1961, Ronald Reagan’s Westminster speech to the British Parliament in 1982, and George W. Bush’s Address to a Joint Session of Congress and the American People in 2001, shortly after the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. , 77 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53701Local ID: ENG C-14OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53701DiVA: diva2:1102261
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf