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Christianitys role in Emily Brontes Wuthering heights
2002 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

There are different modes of worship in Emily Brontë’s novel, Wuthering Heights, and by employing close reading one can see how the different characters perform their religious beliefs. There is the servant, Nelly, who considers herself to be a decent and righteous Christian. She uses her biblical knowledge to punish as well as trying to help people to reach God. There is also Joseph, a loyal Christian servant at Wuthering Heights, who has devoted his life to reprove wickedness and guide people to the right way to salvation. For him, Christianity is everything and he uses the Bible as inspiration when he judges and condemns his surroundings. For the characters Heathcliff and Catherine, Christian doctrines have no role, and they have replaced the Christian heaven with their own version of what heaven is. They prove that institutionalized religion is unnecessary for them. They also reject Nelly’s and Joseph’s help to reach salvation because their love for each other and their heaven are more important than any Christian doctrine. This essay places Wuthering Heights in the context of the Christian religious discourse which was prevalent at the time. The historical process the Church of England went through and people’s loss of belief is also mentioned. The purpose of this essay is to show how Heathcliff and Catherine defy and reject Christian doctrines while at the same time replacing it with their own kind of spirituality. I also describe how Joseph and Nelly use religion as a means of oppression.

Abstract [en]

There are different modes of worship in Emily Brontë’s novel, Wuthering Heights, and by employing close reading one can see how the different characters perform their religious beliefs. There is the servant, Nelly, who considers herself to be a decent and righteous Christian. She uses her biblical knowledge to punish as well as trying to help people to reach God. There is also Joseph, a loyal Christian servant at Wuthering Heights, who has devoted his life to reprove wickedness and guide people to the right way to salvation. For him, Christianity is everything and he uses the Bible as inspiration when he judges and condemns his surroundings. For the characters Heathcliff and Catherine, Christian doctrines have no role, and they have replaced the Christian heaven with their own version of what heaven is. They prove that institutionalized religion is unnecessary for them. They also reject Nelly’s and Joseph’s help to reach salvation because their love for each other and their heaven are more important than any Christian doctrine. This essay places Wuthering Heights in the context of the Christian religious discourse which was prevalent at the time. The historical process the Church of England went through and people’s loss of belief is also mentioned. The purpose of this essay is to show how Heathcliff and Catherine defy and reject Christian doctrines while at the same time replacing it with their own kind of spirituality. I also describe how Joseph and Nelly use religion as a means of oppression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. , 18 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53697Local ID: ENG C-14OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53697DiVA: diva2:1102257
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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