Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Age related Usage of Inderectness in Commands - A Study Based on the Tv shows Dawson´s Creek and Sex and the City
2002 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Being indirect is a way of communicating without being too straightforward and impolite. Instead of making a direct command the imperative can be replaced by a question or statement to make the command gentler. This is a universal phenomenon though indirectness takes on different shapes in different cultures. However, direct commands are not always impolite; by saying “please” a command can be expressed politely. Moreover, indirect commands are not always polite. This kind of command is often used when criticizing, or being ironic or sarcastic. Not much scientific attention has been given to the connection between indirectness and age. The aim of this paper was to see if teenage characters differ from middle-aged characters in the use of indirectness, that is, if teenagers are more direct and less polite when addressing each other. This was done by analyzing a number of episodes of the TV-shows Dawson’s Creek and Sex and the City. What has been focused on is to what extent a direct command is replaced by a question or a statement in conversations where the participants know each other well. The results show that there is no significant difference between the use of indirectness by teenage characters and middle-aged characters. Direct and indirect commands are used equally often in both age groups. When being indirect, the middle-aged characters tend to use questions slightly more than the teenagers who prefer statements to questions. However, the differences are not very great. The degree of politeness has also been analyzed, but here it must be taken into account that the shows are of different genres. There were few polite direct commands in both shows, and the neutral cases predominate. When looking at politeness in indirect commands, which are usually considered polite, it was found that middle-aged characters express themselves in an impolite way to a greater extent than the younger group. The reason for the middle-aged characters’ impoliteness is probably due to the fact that Sex and the city is a comedy show which contains a great deal of irony, sarcasm and jokes. Still, it is interesting that accusing teenagers of being impolite is common, but this investigation does not at all support such a hypothesis

Abstract [en]

Being indirect is a way of communicating without being too straightforward and impolite. Instead of making a direct command the imperative can be replaced by a question or statement to make the command gentler. This is a universal phenomenon though indirectness takes on different shapes in different cultures. However, direct commands are not always impolite; by saying “please” a command can be expressed politely. Moreover, indirect commands are not always polite. This kind of command is often used when criticizing, or being ironic or sarcastic. Not much scientific attention has been given to the connection between indirectness and age. The aim of this paper was to see if teenage characters differ from middle-aged characters in the use of indirectness, that is, if teenagers are more direct and less polite when addressing each other. This was done by analyzing a number of episodes of the TV-shows Dawson’s Creek and Sex and the City. What has been focused on is to what extent a direct command is replaced by a question or a statement in conversations where the participants know each other well. The results show that there is no significant difference between the use of indirectness by teenage characters and middle-aged characters. Direct and indirect commands are used equally often in both age groups. When being indirect, the middle-aged characters tend to use questions slightly more than the teenagers who prefer statements to questions. However, the differences are not very great. The degree of politeness has also been analyzed, but here it must be taken into account that the shows are of different genres. There were few polite direct commands in both shows, and the neutral cases predominate. When looking at politeness in indirect commands, which are usually considered polite, it was found that middle-aged characters express themselves in an impolite way to a greater extent than the younger group. The reason for the middle-aged characters’ impoliteness is probably due to the fact that Sex and the city is a comedy show which contains a great deal of irony, sarcasm and jokes. Still, it is interesting that accusing teenagers of being impolite is common, but this investigation does not at all support such a hypothesis

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. , 26 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53681Local ID: ENG C-13OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53681DiVA: diva2:1102241
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf