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Language features in the portrayal of the presidential candidates Al Gore and George W Bush in some american and british newspapers
2001 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Roger Fowler (1999:1) maintains that ”News is a representation of the world in language…”. In other words, the journalists transform facts into language, but as Fowler continues (1999:1), the result of this transformation is that the facts lose their authenticity and become the general ideas and beliefs of the newspaper. Thus, the language in newspapers, or journalese as it is often termed, is not a neutral form of writing; rather it contains the ideological framework of the newspaper. This c-paper in linguistics deals with the language of newspapers. The aim of this study was to examine whether the language in newspapers varies when portraying the presidential candidates Al Gore and George W. Bush. An additional aim was to see if the political colours of the newspapers could be discovered by the way that the candidates are linguistically portrayed. Four daily newspapers, two British and two American, were used in this study. Three linguistic features were investigated: types of naming, descriptive words and quotations. The results show that there are language differences in the newspapers. The results also show that there are differences in the language used in the British newspapers and the language used in American newspapers. Overall, the British newspapers are more critical in their portrayal of the candidates. The cultural factor was considered as one reason to the differences between the British and American newspapers. Based on the results, a generalised picture of the newspapers political colours could be presented. The conclusion that was drawn on basis of this was that in order to determine the political colours more linguistic features needed to be investigated.

Abstract [en]

Roger Fowler (1999:1) maintains that ”News is a representation of the world in language…”. In other words, the journalists transform facts into language, but as Fowler continues (1999:1), the result of this transformation is that the facts lose their authenticity and become the general ideas and beliefs of the newspaper. Thus, the language in newspapers, or journalese as it is often termed, is not a neutral form of writing; rather it contains the ideological framework of the newspaper. This c-paper in linguistics deals with the language of newspapers. The aim of this study was to examine whether the language in newspapers varies when portraying the presidential candidates Al Gore and George W. Bush. An additional aim was to see if the political colours of the newspapers could be discovered by the way that the candidates are linguistically portrayed. Four daily newspapers, two British and two American, were used in this study. Three linguistic features were investigated: types of naming, descriptive words and quotations. The results show that there are language differences in the newspapers. The results also show that there are differences in the language used in the British newspapers and the language used in American newspapers. Overall, the British newspapers are more critical in their portrayal of the candidates. The cultural factor was considered as one reason to the differences between the British and American newspapers. Based on the results, a generalised picture of the newspapers political colours could be presented. The conclusion that was drawn on basis of this was that in order to determine the political colours more linguistic features needed to be investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 39 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53665Local ID: ENG C-12OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53665DiVA: diva2:1102225
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf