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Jane Eyre - an improved Cinderella
2001 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this essay is to show how Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre could be read as a novel, not only making great use of the “Cinderella” plot, but also revises it. The novel and the fairy tale share a number of features and I will compare these two by taking a closer look at the novel and search for those features typical for the Grimm Brothers’ “Cinderella”. Further, I will point at differences between the two, and argue that they exist in order to improve the fairy tale to create a protagonist who could serve as a role model for the Victorian woman. The similarities are many. As children, both protagonists lost parents and they live with mother substitutes who do not treat them nicely or even as part of their families. Cinderella’s stepmother and Mrs Reed, who is Jane’s aunt and also her mother substitute, both have two daughters who get all the attention and profits Jane and Cinderella are denied. Further, they are both more or less treated as servants. In the end though, both get their prince. The difference between the two stories is that Brontë presents a protagonist who takes charge of her own life and regains her birthright and thereby she is independent. She has also found relatives with whom she feels connected. By the time she marries her prince she is happy and equal to her man, in contrast to Cinderella.

Abstract [en]

The purpose of this essay is to show how Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre could be read as a novel, not only making great use of the “Cinderella” plot, but also revises it. The novel and the fairy tale share a number of features and I will compare these two by taking a closer look at the novel and search for those features typical for the Grimm Brothers’ “Cinderella”. Further, I will point at differences between the two, and argue that they exist in order to improve the fairy tale to create a protagonist who could serve as a role model for the Victorian woman. The similarities are many. As children, both protagonists lost parents and they live with mother substitutes who do not treat them nicely or even as part of their families. Cinderella’s stepmother and Mrs Reed, who is Jane’s aunt and also her mother substitute, both have two daughters who get all the attention and profits Jane and Cinderella are denied. Further, they are both more or less treated as servants. In the end though, both get their prince. The difference between the two stories is that Brontë presents a protagonist who takes charge of her own life and regains her birthright and thereby she is independent. She has also found relatives with whom she feels connected. By the time she marries her prince she is happy and equal to her man, in contrast to Cinderella.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 17 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53664Local ID: ENG C-12OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53664DiVA: diva2:1102224
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf