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A diachronic study of some lexical differences between american and british english
2001 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper was to investigate some lexical differences between American and British English. I endeavoured to see why the two varieties have ended up with a different vocabulary for the school and terminology related to the car, and if there was any pattern in the ways that the words appeared. To try to answer these questions the etymologies for all words and the years when they appeared were examined. _x000B__x000B_The Oxford English Dictionary online was used as the main primary source, but other dictionaries and sources where also consulted to get as true a picture as possible about the origins of the words. The results of the investigation showed that there was no pattern of how the AmE and BrE vocabulary has diverged concerning the two semantic fields. There are various reasons why they use different vocabulary, and I believe that the most important reason is the fact that the Americans and the British people have diverged, thus influencing the language that they speak. Regarding the general trend for how the words appeared in AmE and BrE, the investigation indicated that semantic change was the most common source of new words. Nearly all words had represented something else before they acquired the meanings they have today.

Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper was to investigate some lexical differences between American and British English. I endeavoured to see why the two varieties have ended up with a different vocabulary for the school and terminology related to the car, and if there was any pattern in the ways that the words appeared. To try to answer these questions the etymologies for all words and the years when they appeared were examined. The Oxford English Dictionary online was used as the main primary source, but other dictionaries and sources where also consulted to get as true a picture as possible about the origins of the words. The results of the investigation showed that there was no pattern of how the AmE and BrE vocabulary has diverged concerning the two semantic fields. There are various reasons why they use different vocabulary, and I believe that the most important reason is the fact that the Americans and the British people have diverged, thus influencing the language that they speak. Regarding the general trend for how the words appeared in AmE and BrE, the investigation indicated that semantic change was the most common source of new words. Nearly all words had represented something else before they acquired the meanings they have today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 23 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53656Local ID: ENG C-12OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53656DiVA: diva2:1102216
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf