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Contesting Hunger in Charlotte Brontë´s Jane Eyre
2001 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]

Jane Eyre instantly became a best seller and has remained one ever since. Charlotte Brontë did not only write one of the most popular and widely read novels ever, she also created a new type of female character who did not follow the conventions of the time. She transformed the heroine in fiction and made Jane Eyre different in many ways from the characters in the popular Gothic novels. The character Jane Eyre strives through the course of the novel to become as independent as possible, and she does so through her hunger which is one of the important ways in which Brontë challenges conventions. Transforming the heroine was not completely safe to do in the mid-nineteenth century when women’s roles were set and did not allow any further questioning. Even so, Jane Eyre’s reception was overwhelmingly positive. In this essay I will argue that it is hunger together with other unusual traits that signals Brontë’s transformation of the heroine. Here I will examine Jane Eyre’s hunger for knowledge, love, equality, freedom and independence in the context of, but also in contrast to, the female heroine in Gothic novels and in the context of the expectations on a Victorian woman.

Abstract [en]

Jane Eyre instantly became a best seller and has remained one ever since. Charlotte Brontë did not only write one of the most popular and widely read novels ever, she also created a new type of female character who did not follow the conventions of the time. She transformed the heroine in fiction and made Jane Eyre different in many ways from the characters in the popular Gothic novels. The character Jane Eyre strives through the course of the novel to become as independent as possible, and she does so through her hunger which is one of the important ways in which Brontë challenges conventions. Transforming the heroine was not completely safe to do in the mid-nineteenth century when women’s roles were set and did not allow any further questioning. Even so, Jane Eyre’s reception was overwhelmingly positive. In this essay I will argue that it is hunger together with other unusual traits that signals Brontë’s transformation of the heroine. Here I will examine Jane Eyre’s hunger for knowledge, love, equality, freedom and independence in the context of, but also in contrast to, the female heroine in Gothic novels and in the context of the expectations on a Victorian woman.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. , 19 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-53640Local ID: ENG C-11OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-53640DiVA: diva2:1102200
Subject / course
English
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf