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Constructive or destructive?: The effect of bloggers' criticism on journalists in Kenya
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. (NODE)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4774-4643
2015 (English)In: The Future of Journalism 2015: Risks, Threats and Opportunities: Abstracts / [ed] Stuart Allan, Cardiff: Taylor & Francis, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Widely available media information technologies have spawned an unprecedented growth of lively debates on journalistic performance today. Indeed Web 2.0 technologies like blogs have attracted a huge participation of citizens to engage inscrutiny of content and operations of the traditional media. As a result, journalists and media organisations are now daily targets of a barrage of criticism—including insults—over poor quality of journalism. At the same time, traditional accountability instruments like the press councils are increasingly losing their significance as focus shifts to reforms on traditional media regulation as seen in the UK’s Leveson inquiry of 2011-2012. It is perhaps the reason there has been a growing body of research on participatory media regulation—greater involvement of citizens in traditional media accountability (see for instance, Fengler et al, 2014 on the EU-funded MediaAcT project). However, empirical studies on the new phenomenon—participatory media accountability—have so far been few and limited to the West. Additionally, researchers are surprisingly already celebrating the possibility of having a greater role for citizens in media accountability although among journalists this participation is still being treated with scepticism, according to Fengler et al. This study focuses on the effect of participatory media accountability through criticism by bloggers commenting on journalists’ performance in Kenya. It will involve interviews with newspaper journalists in Kenya with the aim of establishing if criticism on high-trafficblogs run by Kenyans affect their performance positively or negatively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cardiff: Taylor & Francis, 2015.
Keywords [en]
Bloggers, citizen participation, journalism practice, Kenya, media accountability, media criticism, newspapers
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-37979OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-37979DiVA, id: diva2:854810
Conference
The The Future of Journalism Risks, Threats and Opportunities, September 10-11, 2015, Cardiff, United Kingdom
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2016-02-25Bibliographically approved

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Cheruiyot, David

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf