Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Temperature during embryonic development in brown trout influences juvenile behaviour in encounters with predators
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Jakobi Sustainability AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0762-6551
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2220-1615
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3813-9548
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3191-7140
Show others and affiliations
2024 (English)In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 322, no 3, p. 241-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variation in thermal conditions during embryogenesis can have far-reaching impact throughout ontogeny and may give rise to behavioural variation. Many animals, such as salmonids, exhibit behavioural trade-offs related to foraging and predator avoidance. How embryonic temperature affects these behaviours has remained unexplored. Not only abiotic conditions during embryogenesis but also biotic factors such as predator conditioning may affect fish behaviour, especially anti-predator responses. We examined how elevated temperatures and predator odours throughout embryogenesis affect the behaviour of 28-37 mm young-of-the-year brown trout (Salmo trutta) in encounters with predators, namely Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar; 20 cm) and burbot (Lota lota; 40 cm). Juvenile brown trout were more active and aggressive if they were incubated in warmer water as eggs than if they were incubated in colder water, and trout remained inactive longer when encountering predators if they were cold incubated. Brown trout were less active and aggressive when an Atlantic salmon was present than when a burbot or no predator was present. Behavioural responses did not differ between trout that had been subjected to water with versus without predator odours during embryogenesis, possibly because brown trout were not subjected to conspecific alarm cues during egg incubation. This study shows that thermal conditions during embryogenesis can influence fish behaviour early in life and thus contribute to behavioural variation, with potential effects on life history. Considering the rapid warming of northern regions, elevated embryonic temperatures may contribute substantially to variation in salmonid behaviour in the near future. Variation in environmental conditions during embryogenesis of salmonids can have far-reaching impact throughout ontogeny and may give rise to variation in anti-predator behaviour. In a laboratory experiment, we showed that elevated temperatures throughout embryogenesis increased the activity and aggression of 28-37 mm brown trout fry and reduced the time to first movement in encounters with predators (burbot and Atlantic salmon). Predator odour during embryogenesis did not affect brown trout fry behaviour.image

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024. Vol. 322, no 3, p. 241-250
Keywords [en]
anti-predator behaviour, climate change, development, embryogenesis, incubation temperature, salmonid
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97834DOI: 10.1111/jzo.13135ISI: 001118606000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85179367718OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-97834DiVA, id: diva2:1822371
Funder
Karlstad UniversityAvailable from: 2023-12-22 Created: 2023-12-22 Last updated: 2024-04-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(454 kB)8 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 454 kBChecksum SHA-512
ade0e6768086f236852542a5b0923b82272d806b8f21738553b0467acefb165fa5f65e0de65dbcc0a8ff290b66cee8e3586fbed6b166973c8fe51370dfaa8234
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Filipsson, KarlBergman, EvaErlandsson, AnnGreenberg, LarryÖsterling, MartinWatz, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Filipsson, KarlBergman, EvaErlandsson, AnnGreenberg, LarryÖsterling, MartinWatz, Johan
By organisation
Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013)
In the same journal
Journal of Zoology
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 48 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 158 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf