Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Online mathematics enrichment in regular classes
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. (SMEER, ROSE, GiftED)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6525-9871
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. (SMEER, GIftED)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8449-130X
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In mixed-ability classrooms that are common in Swedish upper-secondary school, as well as in other Nordic countries, particularly gifted learners (Skolverket, 2015) are taught alongside all other students (Mellroth et al., 2021) leaving individual teachers with limited time to create enrichment. In what way can enrichment offered online, parallel to regular classes, be used to support the learning development of these learners? In a small-scale project, upper-secondary school students were offered an asynchronous online enrichment program. The program was led by a specialist lecturer at the school (second author) who started by a short meeting individually with each student (self-nominated or identified by their regular teacher). Then, a task aiming to challenge the specific student was uploaded to the student’s individual OneNote. For some tasks, students could choose to reveal guiding questions further, the chat function could be used to pose questions. Once completed, the student uploaded the solution and notified the lecturer who then uploaded a new task and afterwards provided feedback on the solution. The students were allowed to work with the tasks during regular mathematics classes but decided themselves on the pace and timing. The flexibility of the program offered the students an opportunity to adjust to their own needs and desire (Mellroth & Szabo, 2022). Some students worked on a regular basis with the tasks; others only occasionally. Thus, the daily challenge (Rogers, 2007) was offered continuously and consistently and the autonomy of the students (e.g., Leikin & Sriraman, 2017; Szabo, 2017) was accounted for. The students could either write their solutions directly in OneNote, or upload pictures of handwritten solutions. For the lecturer it gave the opportunity to give detailed and personalized feedback. Consistent with research stating that these students gain specifically from straightforward feedback (Leikin & Sriraman, 2017; Szabo, 2017). The online environment also enabled to effectively offer instructional differentiation as suggested by Szabo (2017) as the lecturer easily could adapt comments or offer alternative solutions despite the students going through the program at a different pace. In-depth interviews with the participating students are planned, to investigate their perceptions of stimuli and support through the online enrichment program. Leikin, R., & Sriraman, B. (Eds.) (2017). Creativity and giftedness – Interdisciplinary perspectives from mathematics and beyond. SpringerMellroth, E., Bergwall, A., & Nilsson, P. (2021). Task design for differentiated instruction in mixed-ability mathematics classrooms: Manifestations of contradictions in a professional learning community. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, 23(3), 78–96. Mellroth, E. & Szabo. A. (2022). Talented upper secondary student’s perception of online mathematical challenges. In S. A. Chamberlin (Ed.) On the Road to Mathematical Expertise and Innovation. Proceedings MCG 12. (pp. 311 – 313). VTM-Verlag.Rogers K. B. (2007). Lessons learned about education the gifted and talented: A synthesis of the research on educational practice. Gifted Child Quarterly, 51, 382-396.Skolverket (2015). Särskilt begåvade elever – stödmaterial.Szabo, A. (2017). Matematikundervisning för begåvade elever – en forskningsöversikt. Nordic Studies in Mathematics Education, 22(1), 21–44. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023.
National Category
Educational Sciences Other Mathematics
Research subject
Mathematics didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-94043OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-94043DiVA, id: diva2:1746158
Conference
NERA, Oslo 15-17 mars, 2023
Projects
GiftEDAvailable from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2023-03-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records

van Bommel, JorrytMellroth, Elisabet

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
van Bommel, JorrytMellroth, Elisabet
By organisation
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013)Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research
Educational SciencesOther Mathematics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 163 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf