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Improving the understanding of the bonding mechanism of primary components of biomass pellets through the use of advanced analytical instruments
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4574-1713
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9707-8896
University of Fort Hare, South Africa.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0446-4251
2019 (English)In: Journal of wood chemistry and technology, ISSN 0277-3813, E-ISSN 1532-2319, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have attempted to explain forces holding particles together in densified biomass pellets using theories of forces of attraction between solid particles, forces of adhesion and cohesion, solid bridges and mechanical interlocking bonds including interfacial forces and capillary pressure. This study investigated the bonding mechanism of primary biomass components in densified pellets through the use of advanced analytical instruments able to go beyond what is visible to the naked eye. Data obtained were used to predict how primary biomass components combine to form pellets based on the theory of functional groups and the understanding of structural chemistry. Results showed that hydroxyl and carbonyl functional groups played key roles in helping to identify the type of forces acting between individual particles, at a molecular level. At a microscopic level, morphological examination of the pellet clearly showed solid bridges caused by intermolecular bonding from highly electronegative polar functional groups linked to cellulose and hemicellulose.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019. p. 1-18
Keywords [en]
Biomass pelleting, bonding mechanism, functional groups, primary components, structural chemistry
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Research subject
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74768DOI: 10.1080/02773813.2019.1652324ISI: 000482719600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-74768DiVA, id: diva2:1351685
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved

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Anukam, AnthonyBerghel, JonasFrodeson, Stefan

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