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The effect of breed-specific dog legislation on hospital treated dog bites in Odense, Denmark: A time series intervention study
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6928-0683
Odense University Hospital, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark..ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9281-8990
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1189-9950
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0208393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As dog bite injuries are a considerable problem in modern society, in order to reduce such injuries, breed-specific legislation has been introduced in a number of countries. Whilst many studies have shown a lack of effect with such legislation, the commonly used methodology is known to be flawed. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the Danish breed-specific legislation on the number of dog bite injuries using more credible methods. A time series intervention method was used on a detailed dataset from Odense University Hospital, Denmark, regarding dog bite injuries presented to the emergency department. The results indicate that banning certain breeds has a highly limited effect on the overall levels of dog bite injuries, and that an enforcement of the usage of muzzle and leash in public places for these breeds also has a limited effect. Despite using more credible and sound methods, this study supports previous studies showing that breed-specific legislation seems to have no effect on dog bite injuries. In order to minimise dog bite injuries in the future, it would seem that other interventions or non-breed-specific legislation should be considered as the primary option.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE , 2018. Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0208393
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70969DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0208393ISI: 000454416400018PubMedID: 30586418OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-70969DiVA, id: diva2:1286756
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved

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Nilson, FinnBonander, Carl

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