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Study of the effect of process parameters in laser blown powder with superalloys: Varying laser power and scanning speed, analyzing material properties
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a growing process interesting many companies in many industries. Thereare multiple processes within the familty of AM, but this study focuses on laser blown powder (LBP). LBP involves a laser beam focused on the substrate with powder being blown into the laser beam. The laser beam melts both the powder and the surface of the substrate and as the laser beam moves and the melt pool solidies it leaves a bead of solid material behind. These beads are placed next to each other creating a layer which are then stacked, building the wanted geometry. As the method develops new materials are tested and this study analyses Haynes 282 powder onto Inconel 718 substrate. Multiple process parameters are involved in the LBP method and this study focuses on the impact of laser effect and scanning speed. Each value on the process parameters was inspired by previous reports with similar equipment and process. The laser effect ranges from 1600 W to 700 W, scanning speed ranges between 900 mm/min to 300 mm/min and the powder feeding rate was also varied from 4 g/min to 3 g/min. Each sample was built as a single bead and a multilayer specimen, which is ve layers and 16 beadswide at the bottom and 12 beads wide at the top. When analyzing the samples images from microscopes were mostly used for obtaining results. An image software called ImageJ allowed measurements in an image to obtain penetration depth or primary dendrite arm spacing. ImageJ also allowed measurements of porosity by turning the image binary and calculate the fraction of white and black. The results consists of numerical values and visual analysis of the bead geometry, minimum and maximum penetration, microstructure, porosity, hardness and cracks. The results show an increased bead width around 2 mm to 4 mm and decreased bead height around 0,2 mm to 0,7 mm of single beads with increased laser effect. Increased maximum penetration depth around, 200 μm to 500 μm, withincreased laser effect. More remelt between each deposited layer causing longer dendrites with increasinglaser effect. Porosity is decreased with an increased laser power, going from 0,04 % to 0,15 %. No distinct difference in hardness is observed between the samples, ranging between 255 HV to 310 HV. It is believed that aging causes the increased hardness right above the fusion zone. Cracks were found between dendrites and is believed to be caused by Laves-phases. Most results are comparable to previous similar studies, both as trends and numerical values. The statistics of the study is limited, meaning that all results should not be taken as granted but as a general guide line for more studies. The purpose and goals of the study has been met and completed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 64
Keywords [en]
Additive manufacturing, Laser Blown Powder, Haynes 282, Inconel 718
National Category
Other Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68698OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-68698DiVA, id: diva2:1238212
External cooperation
GKN Aerospace Sweden AB
Educational program
Engineering: Mechanical Engineering, spec. in Materials Engineering (300 ECTS credits)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved

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