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Epigenetics gives new knowledge about learning: The example physical education
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4984-2415
2018 (English)In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2017 Conference: Research, Practice and Collaboration in Science Education / [ed] Odilla Finlayson, Eilish McLoughlin, Sibel Erduran, Peter Childs, Dublin, Ireland: Dublin City University , 2018, Vol. Part 2, p. 367-374Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

New knowledge in biology accumulates fast. This has great implications, for example, for our views of learning. Brain research, as well as research in the new field of epigenetics, have been very intense during the last few decades, and will doubtless influence our view of learning. It is important to follow the development in biology, derive advantages from new insights, and to consider changed practices at school. This paper is an example of how an increased amount of physical education in the school timetable could increase performance in theoretical school subjects. This relation is discussed in the light of the recently discovered epigenetic mechanisms. Studies have revealed epigenetic modifications in the brain cells during learning. Learning, combined with physical activity, has revealed increased epigenetic modifications. Thus, it has been speculated that epigenetic mechanisms might explain improved results in theoretical subjects due to physical activity. This ought to have implications for the school timetable, and lead to more physical education at school. It is discussed that one of the easiest ways to improve results in theoretical school subjects could be to increase the amount of physical education in the school timetable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin, Ireland: Dublin City University , 2018. Vol. Part 2, p. 367-374
Keywords [en]
Curriculum, Learning and Neuroscience, Nature of Science
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48262ISBN: 978-1-873769-84-3 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-48262DiVA, id: diva2:1086957
Conference
ESERA 2017 Conference, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. 21st-25th August, 2017
Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-05 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Mc Ewen, Birgitta

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CiteExportLink to record
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