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Glover, Leigh
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Glover, L. & Granberg, M. (2018). Climate change adaptation policy and political values. In: : . Paper presented at Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018), arbetsgrupp "Environmental Politics". Malmö University on October 3-5..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change adaptation policy and political values
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research and policy into climate change adaptation responses has expanded from the technological, financial and institutional realms into the social realms. There is a growing interest in, and awareness of, political aspects of adaptation policy and planning. This paper considers three aspects of this development and the broad issue of how contemporary political values influences adaptation responses. Firstly, a case is presented for identifying the political values in climate change adaptation policies, plans and programmes. Secondly, a range of political values and ideologies associated with public sector and NGO climate change adaptation measures are identified from contemporary scholarship. Thirdly, a number of implications of adaptation policy stemming from these political values are identified.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69521 (URN)
Conference
Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018), arbetsgrupp "Environmental Politics". Malmö University on October 3-5.
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. & Glover, L. (2014). Adaptation and Maladaptation in Australian National Climate Change Policy. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 16(2), 147-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation and Maladaptation in Australian National Climate Change Policy
2014 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, ISSN 1523-908X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines Australia's national policies for adapting to climate change impacts. Recent developments in research funding, institutional capacities and extreme events have resulted in a greater interest and level of activity in adaptation policy. Based on a historical review of national policy, adaptation policy is considered within a political frame and political values, especially the values of neoliberalism, within adaptation policy are identified. Of interest are the implications of these values for the outcomes of adaptation policy, with attention given to the problem of maladaptation.

Keywords
Climate change, Maladaptation, Australia, Policy, Neoliberalism
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-28657 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2013.823857 (DOI)000338010500001 ()
Available from: 2013-08-17 Created: 2013-08-17 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. & Glover, L. (2013). Climate change adaptation and the regional mess. In: Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC): . Paper presented at Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change adaptation and the regional mess
2013 (English)In: Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC), 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The focus in this paper is on policy and implementation of adaptation policies. The interest in adaptation policy in this text concerns the public policy dimension and not spontaneous social adaptations to changing climate or that undertaken independently by corporations or communities. The focus is on public policy and implementation that are planned, purposeful and intentional. The main issue in this text is how Swedish governance of climate change adaptation is organised and if this type of organising (or lack or organising) can lead to difficulties in reaching long term sustainable adaptation measures or even maladaptation at the local level?

Keywords
climate change, adaptation, maladaptation, regions, municipalities, policy, planing
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26177 (URN)
Conference
Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC)
Available from: 2013-02-05 Created: 2013-02-05 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Glover, L. & Granberg, M. (2013). Comparing Local Government Adaptation Responses to Climate Change in Australia and Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The 6th State of Australian Cities (SOAC) Conference, Sydney, Australia, 26– 29 November.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing Local Government Adaptation Responses to Climate Change in Australia and Sweden
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64761 (URN)
Conference
The 6th State of Australian Cities (SOAC) Conference, Sydney, Australia, 26– 29 November
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. & Glover, L. (2012). Climate Change Adaptation Policy and Practice: The Swedish Experience. In: XXI Nordic Municipal Research Conference (NORKOM), Oslo University, Norway: . Paper presented at NORKOM 2012, Oslo 22.-24. november 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change Adaptation Policy and Practice: The Swedish Experience
2012 (English)In: XXI Nordic Municipal Research Conference (NORKOM), Oslo University, Norway, 2012Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Climate change is a complicated social problem. Formulating and implementing adaptation measures at the local level entails handling value conflicts, power relations, governance, equity, resource allocation, competing interests and, connected to all these issues and more, uncertainty. All this takes place in a complex context where a multitude of factors, and actors representing different societal interests, are interacting both facilitating and hindering effective action and involves changes in modes of operation in society as a whole.

Adaptation range from the local to the large, its time horizon can range from the short to the long terms, it can be tactical or strategic, it can seek immediate, delayed, or cumulative effects, and it can encompass widely differing outcomes.

Accordingly, formulating adaptation responses is a challenging issue for municipalities for a number of reasons. Firstly, the large range of possible climate change impacts. Secondly, the insufficient knowledge base. Thirdly, the lack of consensus on responsibilities. Fourthly, the usual set of problems facing public policy of this sort. In this paper we will focus adaptation measures implemented by Swedish municipalities. The empirical material consists of studies from state authorities of municipal adaptation to climate change.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-25984 (URN)
Conference
NORKOM 2012, Oslo 22.-24. november 2012
Available from: 2013-01-29 Created: 2013-01-29 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Glover, L. & Granberg, M. (2011). Adaptation to climate change as ecological modernisation: Australian experience. In: : . Paper presented at 6th ECPR General Conference, 25th – 27th of August, 2011, Rejljavik, University of Iceland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation to climate change as ecological modernisation: Australian experience
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

National policy approaches to adaptation to climate change in Australia are used to address a research inquiry into the political values of adaptation policies. This study examines whether this public policy response constitutes ecological modernisation and considers the implications. Ecological modernisation’s associations with neo-liberalism are reviewed and an account of key public policies is given. Particular attention is paid to maladaptation risks and the question of the possible influence of ecological modernisation in contributing to these risks. Key findings include that the Australian adaptation policy approach features ecological modernisation, that comprehensive-rational planning is used, and that ecological justice values are at risk

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26058 (URN)
Conference
6th ECPR General Conference, 25th – 27th of August, 2011, Rejljavik, University of Iceland
Available from: 2011-12-20 Created: 2013-01-30 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. & Glover, L. (2010). Trusting invisible hands?: Climate change, political institutions and the market. In: : . Paper presented at The International Conference
 Sustainable Transport in the Asia-Indo-Pacific: Varied Contexts - Common Aims, 2-4 June 2010, University of Melbourne.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trusting invisible hands?: Climate change, political institutions and the market
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26060 (URN)
Conference
The International Conference
 Sustainable Transport in the Asia-Indo-Pacific: Varied Contexts - Common Aims, 2-4 June 2010, University of Melbourne
Available from: 2011-12-20 Created: 2013-01-30 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
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