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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, P. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions. PLoS ONE, 13(7), Article ID e0201155.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness have all been associated with psychological disorders and well-being. This study investigates whether they predict psychological distress, i.e., symptoms of burnout, depression, stress and anxiety, in parents of children with chronic conditions. We hypothesized that these factors would exhibit a large degree of common variance, and that when compared to mindfulness and defusion, experiential avoidance on its own would predict a larger proportion of unique variance. 75 parents of children with chronic conditions having burnout symptoms who participated in an intervention study completed measures of burnout, stress, anxiety, depression, experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness at the beginning of the intervention study (baseline). We ran several regression analyses to assess the predictive ability of these different constructs. Experiential avoidance on its own accounted for 28-48% of the variance in different psychological symptoms. Cognitive defusion and mindfulness did not make a significant contribution to explaining burnout, stress and anxiety, but cognitive defusion contributed to explaining depression. The results confirmed our hypothesis, supporting research on the importance of psychological flexibility as a central factor in understanding the occurrence of psychological distress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
Keywords
COMMITMENT THERAPY, MINDFULNESS QUESTIONNAIRE, INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, EXPERIENTIAL AVOIDANCE, CONSTRUCT-VALIDITY, ACCEPTANCE, BURNOUT
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68794 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0201155 (DOI)000439942500085 ()30044852 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Järvelä-Reijonen, E., Karhunen, L., Sairanen, E., Muotka, J., Lindroos, S., Laitinen, J., . . . Kolehmainen, M. (2018). The effects of acceptance and commitment therapy on eating behavior and diet delivered through face-to-face contact and a mobile app: A randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(22)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of acceptance and commitment therapy on eating behavior and diet delivered through face-to-face contact and a mobile app: A randomized controlled trial
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, no 22, p. -14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Internal motivation and good psychological capabilities are important factors in successful eating-related behavior change. Thus, we investigated whether general acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) affects reported eating behavior and diet quality and whether baseline perceived stress moderates the intervention effects. Methods: Secondary analysis of unblinded randomized controlled trial in three Finnish cities. Working-aged adults with psychological distress and overweight or obesity in three parallel groups: (1) ACT-based Face-to-face (n = 70; six group sessions led by a psychologist), (2) ACT-based Mobile (n = 78; one group session and mobile app), and (3) Control (n = 71; only the measurements). At baseline, the participants' (n = 219, 85% females) mean body mass index was 31.3 kg/m2 (SD = 2.9), and mean age was 49.5 years (SD = 7.4). The measurements conducted before the 8-week intervention period (baseline), 10 weeks after the baseline (post-intervention), and 36 weeks after the baseline (follow-up) included clinical measurements, questionnaires of eating behavior (IES-1, TFEQ-R18, HTAS, ecSI 2.0, REBS), diet quality (IDQ), alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C), perceived stress (PSS), and 48-h dietary recall. Hierarchical linear modeling (Wald test) was used to analyze the differences in changes between groups. Results: Group x time interactions showed that the subcomponent of intuitive eating (IES-1), i.e., Eating for physical rather than emotional reasons, increased in both ACT-based groups (p = .019); the subcomponent of TFEQ-R18, i.e., Uncontrolled eating, decreased in the Face-to-face group (p = .020); the subcomponent of health and taste attitudes (HTAS), i.e., Using food as a reward, decreased in the Mobile group (p = .048); and both subcomponent of eating competence (ecSI 2.0), i.e., Food acceptance (p = .048), and two subcomponents of regulation of eating behavior (REBS), i.e., Integrated and Identified regulation (p = .003, p = .023, respectively), increased in the Face-to-face group. Baseline perceived stress did not moderate effects on these particular features of eating behavior from baseline to follow-up. No statistically significant effects were found for dietary measures. Conclusions: ACT-based interventions, delivered in group sessions or by mobile app, showed beneficial effects on reported eating behavior. Beneficial effects on eating behavior were, however, not accompanied by parallel changes in diet, which suggests that ACT-based interventions should include nutritional counseling if changes in diet are targeted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2018
Keywords
ACT, Behavior change, Dietary intake, Intuitive eating, MHealth, Mindful eating, Mindfulness, Obesity, Overweight, Regulation of eating behavior
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66665 (URN)10.1186/s12966-018-0654-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042546791 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Tolvanen, A., Karhunen, L., Kolehmainen, M., Järvelä-Reijonen, E., Lindroos, S., . . . Lappalainen, R. (2017). Psychological flexibility mediates change in intuitive eating regulation in acceptance and commitment therapy interventions. Public Health Nutrition, 20(9), 1681-1691
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological flexibility mediates change in intuitive eating regulation in acceptance and commitment therapy interventions
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2017 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1681-1691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Despite the promising results related to intuitive eating, few studies have attempted to explain the processes encouraging this adaptive eating behaviour. The focus of the present study was on exploring mechanisms of change in intuitive eating and weight in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) interventions. Mediation provides important information regarding the treatment processes and theoretical models related to specific treatment approaches. The study investigates whether psychological flexibility, mindfulness skills and sense of coherence mediated the interventions' effect on intuitive eating and weight.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized control trial. Mediation analysis compared two ACT interventions - face-to-face (in a group) and mobile (individually) - with a control group using a latent difference score model. Settings Data were collected in three Finnish towns.

SUBJECTS: The participants were overweight or obese (n 219), reporting symptoms of perceived stress.

RESULTS: The effect of the interventions on participants' (i) BMI, (ii) intuitive eating and its subscales, (iii) eating for physical rather than emotional reasons and (iv) reliance on internal hunger and satiety cues was mediated by changes in weight-related psychological flexibility in both ACT groups.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that ACT interventions aiming for lifestyle changes mediate the intervention effects through the enhanced ability to continue with valued activities even when confronted with negative emotions and thoughts related to weight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
Acceptance and commitment therapy Overweight, Intuitive eating, Psychological flexibility
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63846 (URN)10.1017/S1368980017000441 (DOI)000435731200018 ()28414018 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, R. I., Lapveteläinen, A. T. & Karhunen, L. J. (2012). Perceptions, Motives, and Psychological Flexibility Associated with Weight Management. Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy, 2(5), 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions, Motives, and Psychological Flexibility Associated with Weight Management
2012 (English)In: Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy, E-ISSN 2165-7904, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OMICS International, 2012
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63853 (URN)10.4172/2165-7904.1000135 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4499-644x

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