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Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Trischler, J., Dietrich, T. & Rundle-Thiele, S. (2019). Co-design: From expert- to user-driven ideas in public service design. Public Management Review, 21(11), 1595-1619
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-design: From expert- to user-driven ideas in public service design
2019 (English)In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1595-1619Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While co-design with users has evolved as a promising approach to service innovation, it remains unclear how it can be used in public service contexts. This article addresses this knowledge gap by applying a co-design framework during the ideation stage of six public service design projects. The findings provide insights into (a) recruiting and sensitizing suitable service users, (b) conditions enabling users to co-design ideas, and (c) requirements for implementation of user-driven ideas. The article contributes an approach that shifts public service design away from an expert-driven process towards enabling users as active and equal idea contributors. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73564 (URN)10.1080/14719037.2019.1619810 (DOI)000483510400002 ()2-s2.0-85067560394 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J. & Charles, M. (2019). The Application of a Service Ecosystems Lens to Public Policy Analysis and Design: Exploring the Frontiers. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing JPP&M, 38(1), 19-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Application of a Service Ecosystems Lens to Public Policy Analysis and Design: Exploring the Frontiers
2019 (English)In: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing JPP&M, ISSN 0743-9156, E-ISSN 1547-7207, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relevance of marketing for public policy has been questioned because its focus on dyadic exchanges does not consider the dynamism and complexity of public problems. Public service-dominant logic, as a new lens for public policy and management, does not address this limitation, because its focus remains on delivering services to the end user. Integrating recent developments in service-dominant logic and related research, this article proposes applying a service ecosystems lens to public policy. Five propositions guide the application of this lens to public policy analysis and design. Public policy is conceptualized as a means to enable service by coordinating multiple actors' value cocreation activities to address public problems. Inherent in this conceptualization is the multilevel nature of policy analysis, which includes the users' value creation process (micro level), the context (meso level), and the broader value constellation (macro level). Policy design, in turn, includes the identification and support of emergent solutions driven by different actors. Policy makers therefore need to consider problem-conditions-solution combinations across the value constellation and the effect of public interventions on these constellations. The article concludes by presenting policy makers with marketing and design practices that can assist in the analysis of service ecosystems and engage relevant stakeholders in change initiatives.

Keywords
service-dominant logic, public policy, service ecosystems, public service-dominant logic
National Category
Public Administration Studies Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71098 (URN)10.1177/0743915618818566 (DOI)000456847000003 ()
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Wikström, F., Williams, H., Trischler, J. & Rowe, Z. (2019). The importance of packaging functions for food waste of different products in households. Sustainability, 11(9), 1-16, Article ID 2641.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of packaging functions for food waste of different products in households
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1-16, article id 2641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The United Nations sustainability goal SDG 12.3 is to reduce the amount of food that is wasted by half, due to environmental and social reasons. This paper aims to analyse the most important packaging functions that affect food waste in households for different products, as the reason for wastage can be expected to differ between different products. The reasons for food wastage of different categories and products have been compiled through literature studies, and possible improvements of packaging functions to reduce food waste have been identified. In addition, an expert workshop judged the most important packaging functions to reduce food waste for a number of products. They also discussed the obstacles and possibilities to realise the packaging improvements. This study confirms that how packaging functions influence food waste on the product level is a highly unexplored question. Most likely, there is high potential to reduce food waste through better adaptions of packaging functions to user needs and habits. Both the literature study and the expert workshop show that less food per pack and better information regarding food safety and storage have high potential to reduce food waste, but also that product specific considerations are necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Food waste, Household food waste, Packaging development, Packaging functions
National Category
Environmental Management Materials Engineering Food Science
Research subject
Environmental Science; Environmental and Energy Systems; Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73340 (URN)10.3390/su11092641 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067018040 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J., Zehrer, A. & Westman, J. (2018). A designerly way of analyzing the customer experience. Journal of Services Marketing, 23(3), 777-788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A designerly way of analyzing the customer experience
2018 (English)In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 777-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usability of different design methods in understanding the customer experience from a contextual and systemic standpoint.

Design/methodology/approach

Three design methods (i.e. personas, observations and collaborative service mapping) were applied to analyze customer experiences in two service settings. These methods’ usability was compared across the two settings.

Findings

Personas, as informed by phenomenological interviews, provide insights into the customer’s broader lifeworld context. These insights assist in connecting with and understanding the customer experience from a dyadic customer-firm perspective. The involvement of the customer in service mapping activities supports the validation of findings and gives access to experience dimensions beyond the immediate service setting.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is limited to three design methods and is based on small samples. Future research should systematically review design methods to provide a basis for a more comprehensive

evaluation.

Practical implications

To successfully capture the contextual and systemic nature of the customer experience, managers should apply interpretive approaches and actively involve selected customers as “experts of their experiences”. The study provides guidelines on how design methods can be combined and applied to a more holistic customer experience analysis.

Originality/value

The paper shows that design methods, when applied in a combined form, can support an analysis that captures both in-depth insights into the customer’s lifeworld and the complexity of value constellations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Service design, Customer experience, Participatory design, Empathy design, Service mapping
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70215 (URN)10.1108/JSM-04-2017-0138 (DOI)000452703800003 ()
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Hurley, E., Trischler, J. & Dietrich, T. (2018). Exploring the application of co-design to transformative service research. Journal of Services Marketing, 32(6), 715-727
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the application of co-design to transformative service research
2018 (English)In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 715-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate in a transformative service research (TSR) context how users can be involved through co-design and what contributions they can make during this process. Design/methodology/approach: A six-step co-design process was used to plan and facilitate two co-design sessions that involved a total of 24 participants. The collected data include field notes, transcripts from group discussions, recordings of idea presentations and the evaluation of ideas. Findings: A recruitment strategy that uses strong networks and sensitizes users through generating awareness of the underlying issue can prevent the waste of valuable resources. During the facilitation stage, experts need to find the fine line between close guidance and giving voice to the users. User-generated ideas set the starting point for new value propositions that more effectively support users in their value creation processes. Research limitations/implications: The findings are limited to one specific sample and design task. Future research is required that investigates the application of co-design to other TSR contexts. Practical implications: In TSR, organizations will need to follow a different co-design approach owing to the sensitive nature of the design task and/or users that are not driven by innovation-related motivations. Organizations should tap into their networks to raise awareness and recruit suitable participants. To capture users’ unique insights and foster the collective creativity, facilitation should focus on enabling participants through the use of design tools and team management. Originality/value: The study contributes new insights into requirements, challenges and benefits of applying co-design to TSR contexts. The study shows that ordinary users, if empowered, can give important insights into the design of new value propositions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Alcohol education, Co-design, Service innovation, Transformative service research
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69052 (URN)10.1108/JSM-09-2017-0321 (DOI)000449156700005 ()2-s2.0-85049879825 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J. & Lohmann, G. (2018). Monitoring quality of service at Australian airports: A critical analysis. Journal of Air Transport Management, 67, 63-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring quality of service at Australian airports: A critical analysis
2018 (English)In: Journal of Air Transport Management, ISSN 0969-6997, E-ISSN 1873-2089, Vol. 67, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The quality of service monitoring forms a key element of the current light-handed regulation at Australian airports. The ACCC (Australian Competition and Consumer Commission) evaluates and publicly reports the quality of service levels of the four largest airports on a yearly basis to pressure airports to maintain an acceptable service performance. This article aims to provide an in-depth analysis of the methodology used by the ACCC. This analysis includes a critical review of the methodology based on secondary information in combination with primary research (i.e., data from 21 semi-structured interviews) that considers the current perception of the methodology among key stakeholder groups. The research finds that the methodology used by the ACCC is underpinned by some limitations, putting in question its effectiveness, reliability and validity. Particularly, its weak design does not allow for a comprehensive interpretation of the reported results or a reliable comparison across monitored airports, thus reduces transparency. Stakeholders pointed out that it is not possible to evaluate whether an airport undertakes infrastructure investments that ensure both the efficiency of ongoing airport operations and appropriate levels of service quality. These limitations add to the perception that the ACCC in its current function is not a 'credible threat' to airports with market power. Recommendations and future research directions are provided to address the identified limitations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, England: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Quality of service monitoring, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Light-handed regulation, Airport service quality
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66710 (URN)10.1016/j.jairtraman.2017.11.004 (DOI)000426235100007 ()
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J. & Lohmann, G. (2018). Monitoring quality of service at Australian airports: A critical analysis. Journal of Air Transport Management, 67, 63-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring quality of service at Australian airports: A critical analysis
2018 (English)In: Journal of Air Transport Management, ISSN 0969-6997, E-ISSN 1873-2089, Vol. 67, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The quality of service monitoring forms a key element of the current light-handed regulation at Australian airports. The ACCC (Australian Competition and Consumer Commission) evaluates and publicly reports the quality of service levels of the four largest airports on a yearly basis to pressure airports to maintain an acceptable service performance. This article aims to provide an in-depth analysis of the methodology used by the ACCC. This analysis includes a critical review of the methodology based on secondary information in combination with primary research (i.e., data from 21 semi-structured interviews) that considers the current perception of the methodology among key stakeholder groups. The research finds that the methodology used by the ACCC is underpinned by some limitations, putting in question its effectiveness, reliability and validity. Particularly, its weak design does not allow for a comprehensive interpretation of the reported results or a reliable comparison across monitored airports, thus reduces transparency. Stakeholders pointed out that it is not possible to evaluate whether an airport undertakes infrastructure investments that ensure both the efficiency of ongoing airport operations and appropriate levels of service quality. These limitations add to the perception that the ACCC in its current function is not a ‘credible threat’ to airports with market power. Recommendations and future research directions are provided to address the identified limitations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, UK: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Quality of service monitoring, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Light-handed regulation, Airport service quality
National Category
Business Administration Other Computer and Information Science Computer and Information Sciences Telecommunications Communication Systems
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65509 (URN)10.1016/j.jairtraman.2017.11.004 (DOI)000426235100007 ()
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-12Bibliographically approved
Kistler, B., Trischler, J. & Lohmann, G. (2018). Passenger representation within the light-handed regulation - Insights from the Australian air transport market. Transport Policy, 71, 106-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passenger representation within the light-handed regulation - Insights from the Australian air transport market
2018 (English)In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 71, p. 106-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article critically reviews the representation of passengers within the light-handed regulation (LHR) that has been in place in the Australian air transport market since 2002. The focus is the commercial negotiations between airlines and airports concerning investments that affect passengers as key stakeholders, end-users, and payers. The article draws on literature on consumer representation and willingness to pay, as well as data from 21 in-depth interviews. The findings suggest that within the current arrangement, passengers are dependent on airlines as their representatives, although their interests may differ concerning investments in airport infrastructure and services. This dependency is leveraged by the current airline duopoly in the Australian domestic air transport market because passengers have no transport alternatives among which to choose. Airports charging passengers their fees (and eventually negotiating prices for improved services) directly is not deemed a suitable option because it could increase the airports' market power and affect the passenger experience negatively. Recommendations, such as involving an independent representation body and diversifying service provision at the airport, are discussed as possibilities for increasing passengers' influence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Australian air transport market, Consumer representation, Light-handed regulation, Willingness to pay
National Category
Business Administration Economic Geography Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70087 (URN)10.1016/j.tranpol.2018.09.008 (DOI)000447580900010 ()
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J., Pervan, S. J., Kelly, S. J. & Scott, D. R. (2018). The value of codesign: The effect of customer involvement in service design teams. Journal of Service Research, 21(1), 75-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The value of codesign: The effect of customer involvement in service design teams
2018 (English)In: Journal of Service Research, ISSN 1094-6705, E-ISSN 1552-7379, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 75-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Codesign allows a design team to combine two sets of knowledge that are key to service design: Customer insights into latent user needs and in-house professionals’ conversion of promising new ideas into viable concepts. While some studies highlight the potential of codesign, others are more skeptical pointing to a lack of clarity over how the involvement of customers affects the design process and outcomes. This article addresses this knowledge gap by reporting on a real-world comparison of design concepts generated by codesign teams with those generated by an in-house professional team and a team solely made up of users in the course of a library service ideation contest. The comparison indicates that codesign teams generate concepts that score significantly higher in user benefit and novelty but lower in feasibility. However, these outcomes are only possible in cohesive teams that develop design concepts collaboratively. In contrast, in teams where individuals dominate, conflict, less collaboration, and diminished innovation outcomes are more likely. The findings add to a better understanding of the value of codesign and shed light on the complex relationship between design team composition, intrateam factors, and innovation outcomes. Service designers obtain recommendations for selecting customers, assembling teams, and managing intrateam dynamics to enhance codesign success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63550 (URN)10.1177/1094670517714060 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Trischler, J., Dietrich, T. & Rundle-Thiele, S. (2017). A conceptual co-design framework for transformative service research. In: Proceedings of the QUIS15 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management.: . Paper presented at QUIS15 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, June 12-15 2017, Porto, Portugal (pp. 11-20). Porto: FEUP - Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, Portuga
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A conceptual co-design framework for transformative service research
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the QUIS15 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management., Porto: FEUP - Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, Portuga , 2017, p. 11-20Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Porto: FEUP - Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto, Portuga, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63533 (URN)
Conference
QUIS15 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, June 12-15 2017, Porto, Portugal
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2887-2463

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