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Kujala, S., Simola, S., Wang, B., Soone, H., Hagström, J., Bärkås, A., . . . Johansen, M. A. (2024). Benchmarking usability of patient portals in Estonia, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 181, Article ID 105302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benchmarking usability of patient portals in Estonia, Finland, Norway, and Sweden
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2024 (English)In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 181, article id 105302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Poor usability is a barrier to widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHR). Providing good usability is especially challenging in the health care context, as there is a wide variety of patient users. Usability benchmarking is an approach for improving usability by evaluating and comparing the strength and weaknesses of systems. The main purpose of this study is to benchmark usability of patient portals across countries. METHODS: A mixed-methods survey approach was applied to benchmark the national patient portals offering patient access to EHR in Estonia, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. These Nordic countries have similar public healthcare systems, and they are pioneers in offering patients access to EHR for several years. In a survey of 29,334 patients, both patients’ quantitative ratings of usability and their qualitative descriptions of very positive and very negative peak experiences of portal use were collected. RESULTS: The usability scores ranged from good to fair level of usability. The narratives of very positive and very negative experiences included the benefits of the patient portals and experienced usability issues. The regression analysis of results showed that very positive and negative experiences of patient portal use explain 19-35% of the variation of usability scores in the four countries. The percentage of patients who reported very positive or very negative experiences in each country was unrelated to the usability scores across countries. CONCLUSIONS: The survey approach could be used to evaluate usability with a wide variety of users and it supported learning from comparison across the countries. The combination of quantitative and qualitative data provided an approximation of the level of the perceived usability, and identified usability issues to be improved and useful features that patients appreciate. Further work is needed to improve the comparability of the varied samples across countries. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Benchmarking, Electronic Health Records, Estonia, Finland, Humans, Norway, Patient Portals, Sweden, benchmarking, electronic health record, human, medical record
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97916 (URN)10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2023.105302 (DOI)001126157900001 ()38011806 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180006899 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01229Academy of Finland, 352501; 352503
Available from: 2024-01-04 Created: 2024-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Bärkås, A., Kharko, A., Blease, C., Cajander, Å., Johansen Fagerlund, A., Huvila, I., . . . Hägglund, M. (2023). Errors, Omissions, and Offenses in the Health Record of Mental Health Care Patients: Results from a Nationwide Survey in Sweden. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e47841.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Errors, Omissions, and Offenses in the Health Record of Mental Health Care Patients: Results from a Nationwide Survey in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e47841Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Previous research reports that patients with mental health conditions experience benefits, for example, increased empowerment and validation, from reading their patient-accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs). In mental health care (MHC), PAEHRs remain controversial, as health care professionals are concerned that patients may feel worried or offended by the content of the notes. Moreover, existing research has focused on specific mental health diagnoses, excluding the larger PAEHR userbase with experience in MHC. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to establish if and how the experiences of patients with and those without MHC differ in using their PAEHRs by (1) comparing patient characteristics and differences in using the national patient portal between the 2 groups and (2) establishing group differences in the prevalence of negative experiences, for example, rates of errors, omissions, and offenses between the 2 groups. METHODS: Our analysis was performed on data from an online patient survey distributed through the Swedish national patient portal as part of our international research project, NORDeHEALTH. The respondents were patient users of the national patient portal 1177, aged 15 years or older, and categorized either as those with MHC experience or with any other health care experience (nonmental health care [non-MHC]). Patient characteristics such as gender, age, education, employment, and health status were gathered. Portal use characteristics included frequency of access, encouragement to read the record, and instances of positive and negative experiences. Negative experiences were further explored through rates of error, omission, and offense. The data were summarized through descriptive statistics. Group differences were analyzed through Pearson chi-square. RESULTS: Of the total sample (N=12,334), MHC respondents (n=3131) experienced errors (1586/3131, 50.65%, and non-MHC 3311/9203, 35.98%), omissions (1089/3131, 34.78%, and non-MHC 2427/9203, 26.37%) and offenses (1183/3131, 37.78%, and non-MHC 1616/9203, 17.56%) in the electronic health record at a higher rate than non-MHC respondents (n=9203). Respondents reported that the identified error (MHC 795/3131, 50.13%, and non-MHC 1366/9203, 41.26%) and omission (MHC 622/3131, 57.12%, and non-MHC 1329/9203, 54.76%) were "very important," but most did nothing to correct them (MHC 792/3131, 41.29%, and non-MHC 1838/9203, 42.17%). Most of the respondents identified as women in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: About 1 in 2 MHC patients identified an error in the record, and about 1 in 3 identified an omission, both at a much higher rate than in the non-MHC group. Patients with MHC also felt offended by the content of the notes more commonly (1 in 3 vs 1 in 6). These findings validate some of the worries expressed by health care professionals about providing patients with MHC with PAEHRs and highlight challenges with the documentation quality in the records. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2023
Keywords
electronic health records, EHR; mental health, mental health care, national survey, online records access, open notes, ORA, patient-accessible electronic health record, PAEHR, patients, user experiences
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97558 (URN)10.2196/47841 (DOI)001104378500001 ()37921861 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176200077 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01229
Available from: 2023-11-28 Created: 2023-11-28 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Barry, P. & Kane, B. (2023). Global Virtual Team Working during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Interacting with computers, 35(5), 681-690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Virtual Team Working during the Covid-19 Pandemic
2023 (English)In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 681-690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: center dot A qualitative study of Global Virtual Teams (GVTs) and their challenges during the Covid-19 Pandemic. center dot GVT members became proactive in dealing with the challenges of 100% remote working. center dot GVTs adapt their methods of working and the tools available to them. center dot Communication failures, building trust and relationships, and resolving conflict are significant challenges. center dot Lack of informal communication opportunities adversely affects relationships in GVTs. center dot Further investigation of gender differences in attitudes and practices are prompted; and the associations between trust and conflict resolution in virtual relationships. Virtual work introduces distinct challenges when compared to face-to-face or on-site work. Communication and collaboration are key factors in team development and in team performance. When teamwork is of a global nature, imposed because of a pandemic, then additional variables are introduced into the equation. The challenges that global virtual teams (GVTs) encounter when communicating and developing in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic impacts how work is structured and teams develop. This qualitative study was conducted just over 1 year after the start of the Covid-19 pandemic when working from home became mandatory and particular challenges for GVTs became apparent. Data are gathered through an online anonymous survey and followed by semi-structured video-mediated interviews with staff in a large multinational software development company. Findings show that GVTs encounter a number of distinct challenges than face-to-face teams. However, individuals are actively adapting to the situation in which they find themselves and are learning to deal with the challenges by being proactive. Even though the tools used previously may not be entirely suitable for virtual work, GVTs learn to change how tools are used to be more productive and collaborative. Challenges continue to exist in areas, such as knowledge gathering and knowledge sharing. Communication failures can lead to delays and confusion. The findings also indicate that even though GVTs are not communicating as much informally or socially with their colleagues because of remote working in the pandemic, being remote is not having a negative effect on the ability to get work done. Some aspects of team development can be negatively affected when working in GVTs. Impacts are identified relating to trust and relationship building, as well as being able to identify and resolve conflict. These results prompt further research opportunities as organizations and individuals continue to adapt and embrace global virtual teamwork.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
Covid-19 pandemic, global virtual teams, communication, teamwork
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-94633 (URN)10.1093/iwc/iwad029 (DOI)000973291400001 ()
Available from: 2023-05-12 Created: 2023-05-12 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Simola, S., Hörhammer, I., Xu, Y., Bärkås, A., Fagerlund, A. J., Hagström, J., . . . Kujala, S. (2023). Patients’ Experiences of a National Patient Portal and Its Usability: Cross-Sectional Survey Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e45974.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ Experiences of a National Patient Portal and Its Usability: Cross-Sectional Survey Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e45974Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patient portals not only provide patients with access to electronic health records (EHRs) and other digital health services, such as prescription renewals, but they can also improve patients’ self-management, engagement with health care professionals (HCPs), and care processes. However, these benefits depend on patients’ willingness to use patient portals and, ultimately, their experiences with the usefulness and ease of use of the portals. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the perceived usability of a national patient portal and the relationship of patients’ very positive and very negative experiences with perceived usability. The study was aimed to be the first step in developing an approach for benchmarking the usability of patient portals in different countries. Methods: Data were collected through a web-based survey of the My Kanta patient portal’s logged-in patient users in Finland from January 24, 2022, to February 14, 2022. Respondents were asked to rate the usability of the patient portal, and the ratings were used to calculate approximations of the System Usability Scale (SUS) score. Open-ended questions asked the patients about their positive and negative experiences with the patient portal. The statistical analysis included multivariate regression, and the experience narratives were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Results: Of the 1,262,708 logged-in patient users, 4719 responded to the survey, giving a response rate of 0.37%. The patient portal’s usability was rated as good, with a mean SUS score of 74.3 (SD 14.0). Reporting a very positive experience with the portal was positively associated with perceived usability (β=.51; P<.001), whereas reporting a very negative experience was negatively associated with perceived usability (β=−1.28; P<.001). These variables explained 23% of the variation in perceived usability. The information provided and a lack of information were the most common positive and negative experiences. Furthermore, specific functionalities, such as prescription renewal and the ease of using the patient portal, were often mentioned as very positive experiences. The patients also mentioned negative emotions, such as anger and frustration, as part of their very negative experiences. Conclusions: The study offers empirical evidence about the significant role of individual experiences when patients are evaluating the usability of patient portals. The results suggest that positive and negative experiences provide relevant information that can be used for improving the patient portal’s usability. Usability should be improved so that patients receive information efficiently, easily, and quickly. Respondents would also appreciate interactive features in the patient portal. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2023
Keywords
Benchmarking, Cross-Sectional Studies, Electronic Health Records, Finland, Humans, Patient Portals, adult, anger, article, benchmarking, clinical evaluation, content analysis, electronic health record, emotion, female, Finland, frustration, health survey, human, major clinical study, male, narrative, prescription, usability, cross-sectional study, electronic health record, medical record
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96280 (URN)10.2196/45974 (DOI)001026704100001 ()37389909 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164233640 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Academy of Finland, 352501, 352503NordForsk, 100477
Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, M., Kharko, A., Hagström, J., Bärkås, A., Blease, C., Cajander, Å., . . . Johansen, M. A. (2023). The NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey: Cross-Sectional Study of National Patient Portal Users in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e47573.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey: Cross-Sectional Study of National Patient Portal Users in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e47573Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although many surveys have been conducted on patients accessing their own health records in recent years, there is a limited amount of nationwide cross-country data available on patients’ views and preferences. To address this gap, an international survey of patient users was conducted in the Nordic eHealth project, NORDeHEALTH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the sociodemographic characteristics and experiences of patients who accessed their electronic health records (EHRs) through national patient portals in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia. METHODS: A cross-sectional web-based survey was distributed using the national online health portals. The target participants were patients who accessed the national patient portals at the start of 2022 and who were aged ≥15 years. The survey included a mixture of close-ended and free-text questions about participant sociodemographics, usability experience, experiences with health care and the EHR, reasons for reading health records online, experience with errors, omissions and offense, opinions about security and privacy, and the usefulness of portal functions. In this paper, we summarized the data on participant demographics, past experience with health care, and the patient portal through descriptive statistics. RESULTS: In total, 29,334 users completed the survey, of which 9503 (32.40%) were from Norway, 13,008 (44.35%) from Sweden, 4713 (16.07%) from Finland, and 2104 (7.17%) from Estonia. National samples were comparable according to reported gender, with about two-thirds identifying as women (19,904/29,302, 67.93%). Age distributions were similar across the countries, but Finland had older users while Estonia had younger users. The highest attained education and presence of health care education varied among the national samples. In all 4 countries, patients most commonly rated their health as "fair" (11,279/29,302, 38.48%). In Estonia, participants were more often inclined to rate their health positively, whereas Norway and Sweden had the highest proportion of negative health ratings. Across the whole sample, most patients received some care in the last 2 years (25,318/29,254, 86.55%). Mental health care was more common (6214/29,254, 21.24%) than oncological care (3664/29,254, 12.52%). Overall, most patients had accessed their health record "2 to 9 times" (11,546/29,306, 39.4%), with the most frequent users residing in Sweden, where about one-third of patients accessed it "more than 20 times" (4571/13,008, 35.14%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first large-scale international survey to compare patient users’ sociodemographics and experiences with accessing their EHRs. Although the countries are in close geographic proximity and demonstrate similar advancements in giving their residents online records access, patient users in this survey differed. We will continue to investigate patients’ experiences and opinions about national patient-accessible EHRs through focused analyses of the national and combined data sets from the NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2023
Keywords
electronic health record, health data, national survey, online medical record, online records access, patient access, patient portal, patient-accessible electronic health record
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97576 (URN)10.2196/47573 (DOI)001106906500004 ()37955963 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176787931 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk, 100477Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01229Academy of Finland, 352501; 352503
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Wang, B., Kristiansen, E., Fagerlund, A. J., Zanaboni, P., Hägglund, M., Bärkås, A., . . . Johansen, M. A. (2023). Users’ Experiences With Online Access to Electronic Health Records in Mental and Somatic Health Care: Cross-Sectional Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e47840.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Users’ Experiences With Online Access to Electronic Health Records in Mental and Somatic Health Care: Cross-Sectional Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e47840Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patient-accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) hold promise for empowering patients, but their impact may vary between mental and somatic health care. Medical professionals and ethicists have expressed concerns about the potential challenges of PAEHRs for patients, especially those receiving mental health care. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate variations in the experiences of online access to electronic health records (EHRs) among persons receiving mental and somatic health care, as well as to understand how these experiences and perceptions vary among those receiving mental health care at different levels of point of care. METHODS: Using Norwegian data from the NORDeHEALTH 2022 Patient Survey, we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive analysis of service use and perceptions of perceived mistakes, omissions, and offensive comments by mental and somatic health care respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze free-text responses to understand how respondents experienced the most serious errors in their EHR. RESULTS: Among 9505 survey participants, we identified 2008 mental health care respondents and 7086 somatic health care respondents. A higher percentage of mental health care respondents (1385/2008, 68.97%) reported that using PAEHR increased their trust in health care professionals compared with somatic health care respondents (4251/7086, 59.99%). However, a significantly larger proportion (P<.001) of mental health care respondents (976/2008, 48.61%) reported perceiving errors in their EHR compared with somatic health care respondents (1893/7086, 26.71%). Mental health care respondents also reported significantly higher odds (P<.001) of identifying omissions (758/2008, 37.75%) and offensive comments (729/2008, 36.3%) in their EHR compared with the somatic health care group (1867/7086, 26.35% and 826/7086, 11.66%, respectively). Mental health care respondents in hospital inpatient settings were more likely to identify errors (398/588, 67.7%; P<.001) and omissions (251/588, 42.7%; P<.001) than those in outpatient care (errors: 422/837, 50.4% and omissions: 336/837, 40.1%; P<.001) and primary care (errors: 32/100, 32% and omissions: 29/100, 29%; P<.001). Hospital inpatients also reported feeling more offended (344/588, 58.5%; P<.001) by certain content in their EHR compared with respondents in primary (21/100, 21%) and outpatient care (287/837, 34.3%) settings. Our qualitative findings showed that both mental and somatic health care respondents identified the most serious errors in their EHR in terms of medical history, communication, diagnosis, and medication. CONCLUSIONS: Most mental and somatic health care respondents showed a positive attitude toward PAEHRs. However, mental health care respondents, especially those with severe and chronic concerns, expressed a more critical attitude toward certain content in their EHR compared with somatic health care respondents. A PAEHR can provide valuable information and foster trust, but it requires careful attention to the use of clinical terminology to ensure accurate, nonjudgmental documentation, especially for persons belonging to health care groups with unique sensitivities. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2023
Keywords
patient empowerment, online access to electronic health records, patient-accessible electronic health record, patient access, user perspective, psychiatry, electronic health record, health data, patient portal, online records access
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Nursing
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-98038 (URN)10.2196/47840 (DOI)001146575700004 ()38145466 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180801579 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk, 100477Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-01229Academy of Finland, 352501 and 352503
Available from: 2024-01-17 Created: 2024-01-17 Last updated: 2024-02-16Bibliographically approved
Darbey, I. & Kane, B. (2022). Analysing Out-patient Demand and Forecasting Theatre Requirements in a Teaching Hospital. In: Shen L., Gonzalez A.R., Santosh KC., Lai Z., Sicilia R., Almeida J.R., Kane B. (Ed.), Proceedings-IEEE Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems: . Paper presented at 35th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems(CBMS), Shenzhen, China, July 21-23, 2022. (pp. 240-245). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022-July
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysing Out-patient Demand and Forecasting Theatre Requirements in a Teaching Hospital
2022 (English)In: Proceedings-IEEE Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems / [ed] Shen L., Gonzalez A.R., Santosh KC., Lai Z., Sicilia R., Almeida J.R., Kane B., Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022, Vol. 2022-July, p. 240-245Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Understanding demand on healthcare services is critical to inform resourcing decisions for service demands. We ask two questions: 1) Can out-patient (OPD) demand for the plastic and reconstructive services be forecast? 2) Can we predict theatre requirements in terms of volume, type or complexity? The use of Time Series Analysis (TSA), simulation modelling, data-driven methods including data mining are reviewed to address the questions. Starting with a knowledge-discovery in databases methodology, Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) TSA is applied to forecast OPD referral demand. Monte Carlo simulation (MCs) is used to forecast the theatre requirements in terms of type, complexity, volume, and duration. The ARIMA modelling forecasts 4,151 OPD referrals in the coming 12 months, which results in the requirement for 499 theatre sessions with intensive care facilities (total of 671 surgical intervention procedures); 301 minor theatre sessions (total of 1,836 procedures) and 206 theatre sessions (total of 761 procedures). Surgical intervention (procedure) types and theatre requirements form the research output that predicts an increase in theatre capacity is required to keep pace with demand in the short term. The insight provided into issues allows informed strategy development and decision-making. Our methodology can be easily adapted and applied to other surgical specialities with similar datasets. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022
Keywords
Data mining, Decision making, Hospitals, Intelligent systems, Monte Carlo methods, Surgery, Theaters, Time series analysis, Auto-regressive, Healthcare, Healthcare services, Operation, Out-patients, Resourcing, Simulation, Surgical interventions, Time-series analysis, Times series, Forecasting
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics Business Administration Economics
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-92195 (URN)10.1109/CBMS55023.2022.00049 (DOI)000864612300042 ()2-s2.0-85137927157 (Scopus ID)9781665467704 (ISBN)
Conference
35th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems(CBMS), Shenzhen, China, July 21-23, 2022.
Available from: 2022-10-12 Created: 2022-10-12 Last updated: 2022-11-04Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, M., Cajander, Å., Rexhepi, H. & Kane, B. (2022). Personalized Digital Health and Patient-Centric Services. Frontiers in Computer Science, 4, Article ID 862358.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personalized Digital Health and Patient-Centric Services
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Computer Science, E-ISSN 2624-9898, Vol. 4, article id 862358Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Preventing medical errors and improving patient health outcomes are challenges faced by healthcare systems worldwide. Digitalization and the development of eHealth solutions are essential to enhance the quality of care and empower patients to engage actively in managing their health, and collaboration with healthcare services. By adapting these solutions to the individual patient's needs, we can achieve personalized digital health. Digital health and eHealth are often used interchangeably, and there is no real agreement on the scope or overlap of the concepts. In this editorial, we use the concepts as synonyms. Over recent years, efforts have been made to develop digital health services that aim to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare through innovative approaches and strengthen the opportunities for self-care, self-management, and patient participation. These eHealth services are increasing as a result of the patient empowerment and patients' rights movements that campaign for easy access to medical data (Wiljer et al., 2008; Wass and Vimarlund, 2018; Bärkås et al., 2021), patient participation in their care (Riggare et al., 2019a), and in the design and improvement of the healthcare systems including eHealth services (Riggare et al., 2021).

Keywords
digital health (eHealth), patient accessible electronic health record, digital divide, participatory design (PD), usability, self-management, telemedicine
National Category
Health Sciences Information Systems Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-89663 (URN)10.3389/fcomp.2022.862358 (DOI)000783312500001 ()2-s2.0-85127402072 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk, 100477
Available from: 2022-04-28 Created: 2022-04-28 Last updated: 2022-06-08Bibliographically approved
Khumalo, A. & Kane, B. (2022). Perspectives on record-keeping practices in MDT meetings and meeting record utility. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 161, Article ID 104711.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on record-keeping practices in MDT meetings and meeting record utility
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 161, article id 104711Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose: Working collaboratively as a multidisciplinary team in the treatment and care of cancer patients is proven effective in increasing the quality of patient care. A multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting (MDTM) is the main vehicle that facilitates this collaborative work between different healthcare specialities, and an appropriate meeting record is essential to communicate the meeting's outcomes. There is limited research to date regarding MDTM documentation, and here we report on a sample of healthcare professional's perspectives on current practices. Methodology: A survey, distributed to a purposive snowball sample, is used to collect the perceptions on record-keeping at MDTMs from involved healthcare workers. The survey is descriptive and exploratory in nature and uses closed and open-ended questions offered in both English and Swedish. Results: With a response of 37 healthcare workers, several commonly understood practices of MDTMs are confirmed, documentation is mostly electronic, encompasses suggested information, and the record is mostly acceptable in quality. The issues of responsibility, registering attendance, and verification of documentation can be improved. Conclusion: Electronic documentation is a laudable step that shows advancement in MDTM record-keeping. The highlighted quality of the records suggests that MDTM proceedings are reasonably well documented. There remain some important questions, with regard to standardization, centralization, and the responsibility for record-keeping at MDTMs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
MDT records, Meeting records, Multidisciplinary Team Meetings, Patient treatment, Surveys, Cancer patients, Healthcare workers, Meeting record, Multidisciplinary team meeting, Multidisciplinary team record, Multidisciplinary teams, Patient care, Record keeping, Team meetings, Records management, centralization, conference paper, documentation, health care personnel, human, multidisciplinary team, perception, responsibility, snowball sample, standardization
National Category
Other Health Sciences Medical Engineering
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-89464 (URN)10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2022.104711 (DOI)000790935000009 ()2-s2.0-85124806545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-12 Created: 2022-04-12 Last updated: 2022-05-19Bibliographically approved
Cheng, C., Humphreys, H. & Kane, B. (2022). Transition to telehealth: Engaging medical students in telemedicine healthcare delivery. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 191, 2405-2422
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transition to telehealth: Engaging medical students in telemedicine healthcare delivery
2022 (English)In: Irish Journal of Medical Science, ISSN 0021-1265, E-ISSN 1863-4362, Vol. 191, p. 2405-2422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, telemedicine has been increasingly incorporated into medical practice, a process which has now been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. As telemedicine continues to progress, it is necessary for medical institutions to incorporate telemedicine into their curricula, and to provide students with the necessary skills and experience to effectively carry out telemedicine consultations. The purposes of this study are to review the involvement of medical students with telemedicine and to determine both the benefits and the challenges experienced. A literature review on the MEDLINE; CINAHL Plus; APA PsychInfo; Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts; and Health Business Elite databases was performed on September 7, 2020, yielding 561 results. 33 manuscripts were analysed, with the main benefits and challenges experienced by medical students summarized. In addition to increasing their understanding of the importance of telemedicine and the acquisition of telemedicine-specific skills, students may use telemedicine to act as a valuable workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic. Challenges that students face, such as discomfort with carrying out telemedicine consults and building rapport with patients, may be addressed through the incorporation of telemedicine teaching into the medical curricula through experiential learning. However, other more systemic challenges, such as technical difficulties and cost, need to be examined for the full benefits of telemedicine to be realized. Telemedicine is here to stay and has proven its worth during the COVID-19 pandemic, with medical students embracing its potential in assisting in medical clinics, simulation of clinical placements, and online classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
COVID-19, Medical education, Medical students, Telehealth, Telemedicine
National Category
Information Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-87282 (URN)10.1007/s11845-021-02720-1 (DOI)000705742900001 ()34626350 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85116836411 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-22 Created: 2021-11-22 Last updated: 2022-10-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3211-6529

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