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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Pamment, J. (2015). Media Influence, Ontological Transformation, and Social Change: Conceptual Overlaps Between Development Communication and Public Diplomacy. Communication Theory, 25(2), 188-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media Influence, Ontological Transformation, and Social Change: Conceptual Overlaps Between Development Communication and Public Diplomacy
2015 (English)In: Communication Theory, ISSN 1050-3293, E-ISSN 1468-2885, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 188-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Development Communication and Public Diplomacy are twin products of U.S. political science and Cold War foreign policy. As contemporary diplomatic and development policies continue to converge, new ways of interpreting the relationship between the fields are necessary. This article analyses the 2 fields' emergence out of modernization policy and their reliance on a common conception of process: namely, that information propagated through media channels alters how foreign citizens know the world around them, and that this transformation can lead to positive social change. More recent paradigmatic shifts toward participatory communication models demonstrate that both fields have moved toward inclusive conceptualizations of influence and social change, but key differences suggest that they still have much to learn from each other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2015
Keywords
Development Communication, Public Diplomacy, Social Change, Soft Power, Modernization, Participatory Communication
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41618 (URN)10.1111/comt.12064 (DOI)000354825200005 ()
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2015). “Putting the GREAT Back into Britain”: National Identity, Public-Private Collaboration & Transfers of Brand Equity in 2012’s Global Promotional Campaign. British Journal of Politics & International Relations, 17(2), 260-283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Putting the GREAT Back into Britain”: National Identity, Public-Private Collaboration & Transfers of Brand Equity in 2012’s Global Promotional Campaign
2015 (English)In: British Journal of Politics & International Relations, ISSN 1369-1481, E-ISSN 1467-856X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 260-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The GREAT campaign is one of the most ambitious national promotion efforts ever undertaken.Timed to make the most of Britain's raised profile during Olympic year, the aim was to promotetrade, investment and tourism under a unified identity emphasising British achievements.However, the campaign raises a number of issues. The first is how and why GREAT emerged as analternative to established structures for soft power, public diplomacy and marketing in the UK. Thesecond is the ways GREAT engages with collective identity through the nationalisation and com-modification of symbolic resources. Third is the practices used to include and exclude specific targetgroups and stakeholders. Fourth is the interaction between economic and symbolic resources,including public-private collaboration and the evidence used to determine impact and value. Thesethemes contribute to an analysis of GREAT that will be of interest to scholars of politics and IR inthe UK and internationally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
nation branding, public diplomacy, nationalism, identity
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32207 (URN)10.1111/1467-856X.12039 (DOI)000352569600005 ()
Available from: 2014-05-29 Created: 2014-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2015). Strategic Communication Campaigns at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Managing Mediatization During the Papal Visit, the Royal Wedding, and the Queen´s Visit to Ireland. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 9(2), 118-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Communication Campaigns at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Managing Mediatization During the Papal Visit, the Royal Wedding, and the Queen´s Visit to Ireland
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Strategic Communication, ISSN 1553-118X, E-ISSN 1553-1198, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 118-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates strategic communication in the context of the wider adoption of “campaign” approaches to public diplomacy at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office. The three case studies are the visit of Pope Benedict XVI to the United Kingdom, the marriage of HRH Prince William to Kate Middleton, and Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Ireland. The analytical framework seeks to situate strategic communication theory within a political–economic environment pervaded by a dependence on the media and its institutions for sociopolitical knowledge. Therefore, while affirming the growth and influence of strategic communication as a social phenomenon, this article questions how processes of mediatization impact strategic communication, its organization and practices. The case studies reveal characteristic techniques such as managing mediated spaces for meetings and discussion; shaping the salience of target groups, stakeholders, and participants; an emphasis on values and norms that may be tailored efficiently to different circumstances; and, a strong focus on achieving strategic consistency across diverse messages and messengers. The results will be of interest to researchers and students interested in better understanding how organizations utilize complementary communicative techniques to shape knowledge and steer experiences of political events in ways supportive of their overarching goals. © , Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-44826 (URN)10.1080/1553118X.2015.1008633 (DOI)2-s2.0-84927776774 (Scopus ID)
Note

cited By 0

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Articulating Influence: Toward a Research Agenda for Interpreting the Evaluation of Soft Power, Public Diplomacy and Nation Brands. Public Relations Review, 40(1), 50-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Articulating Influence: Toward a Research Agenda for Interpreting the Evaluation of Soft Power, Public Diplomacy and Nation Brands
2014 (English)In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 50-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the terms soft power, public diplomacy (PD) and nation brands have cemented their place in academic discourse during the early 21st century, the evaluation of these activities has not been given anywhere near the same level of attention. When describing how campaigns are evaluated, scholars tend to make assumptions based on the goals or outputs of an initiative rather than on the basis of reliable, empirical data on its results. Strong positivist tendencies within current scholarship usually lead to evaluation being considered in terms of methodology and best practice, typically with the assumption that certain preferred outcomes will be demonstrable if an ideal model is followed. Most significantly, such approaches seem to underplay the interests and objectives that inform and constrain choices surrounding modes of communication and evaluation. I argue here that PD activities are rarely the product of rational choices about communication options, and nor is PD evaluation the result of applying the "best" methodology. Rather, questions of PD and evaluation practices are bound together in complex organizational and power structures that generate pragmatic responses both to the "problem of influence" and the reporting of results. Through use of the concept of articulation, this article outlines a framework for interpreting evaluation practices from a contextualized perspective, which grasps how and why soft power practices assume certain forms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Soft power, Public diplomacy, Nation brands, Evaluation
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-31548 (URN)10.1016/j.pubrev.2013.11.019 (DOI)000331506400007 ()
Available from: 2014-02-23 Created: 2014-02-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Branding the Nation: The Global Business of National Identity [Review]. International Journal of Communication, 8, 1803-1806
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Branding the Nation: The Global Business of National Identity
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 1803-1806Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41567 (URN)000349010500026 ()
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Public Diplomacy & International Development: Conceptual Convergences?. In: : . Paper presented at ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public Diplomacy & International Development: Conceptual Convergences?
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32214 (URN)
Conference
ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto
Available from: 2014-05-29 Created: 2014-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Strategic Communication Campaigns at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office: Managing Mediatization during the Papal Visit (2010), the Queen’s Visit to Ireland and the Royal Wedding (2011). In: : . Paper presented at ICA Preconference: Strategic Communication Seattle 22 May.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Communication Campaigns at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office: Managing Mediatization during the Papal Visit (2010), the Queen’s Visit to Ireland and the Royal Wedding (2011)
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32210 (URN)
Conference
ICA Preconference: Strategic Communication Seattle 22 May
Available from: 2014-05-29 Created: 2014-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Strategic Narratives in U.S. Public Diplomacy: A Critical Geopolitics. Popular Communication, 12(1), 48-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Narratives in U.S. Public Diplomacy: A Critical Geopolitics
2014 (English)In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 48-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-31549 (URN)10.1080/15405702.2013.868899 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-02-23 Created: 2014-02-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Sweden, Inc and the campaign to sell JAS-Gripen to the Swiss electorate. In: : . Paper presented at ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden, Inc and the campaign to sell JAS-Gripen to the Swiss electorate
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32215 (URN)
Conference
ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto
Available from: 2014-05-29 Created: 2014-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pamment, J. (2014). Swedish Public Diplomacy. In: : . Paper presented at ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Public Diplomacy
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32212 (URN)
Conference
ISA International Studies Association, March 2014, Toronto
Available from: 2014-05-29 Created: 2014-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5128-1007

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