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Stigsdotter Neely, AnnaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3450-8067
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Vaskivuo, L., Hokkanen, L., Hänninen, T., Antikainen, R., Bäckman, L., Laatikainen, T., . . . Ngandu, T. (2018). Associations between prospective and retrospective subjective memory complaints and neuropsychological performance in older adults: The finger study. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 24(10), 1099-1109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between prospective and retrospective subjective memory complaints and neuropsychological performance in older adults: The finger study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, ISSN 1355-6177, E-ISSN 1469-7661, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1099-1109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are among the key concerns in the elderly, but their role in detecting objective cognitive problems is unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between SMCs (both prospective and retrospective memory complaints) and neuropsychological test performance in older adults at risk of cognitive decline. Methods: This investigation is part of the FINGER project, a multicenter randomized controlled trial aiming at preventing cognitive decline in high-risk individuals. The cognitive assessment of participants was conducted at baseline using a modified neuropsychological test battery (NTB). SMCs were evaluated with the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) in a sub-sample of 560 participants (mean age, 69.9 years). Results: Having more prospective SMCs was associated with slower processing speed, but not with other NTB domains. Retrospective SMCs were linked to poorer function on NTB total score, processing speed, and memory. Executive function domain was not associated with any PRMQ ratings. Depressive symptoms and poor quality of life diluted the observed associations for NTB total score and memory. However, the association between PRMQ and processing speed remained even after full adjustments. Conclusions: Our results indicate that self-reported memory problems, measured with PRMQ, are associated with objectively measured cognitive performance. Such complaints in healthy elderly people also seem to reflect reduced mental tempo, rather than memory deficits. Slowing of processing speed may thus be negatively related to memory self-efficacy. It is also important to consider affective factors among those who report memory problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Cognitive performance, Memory, Processing speed, Prospective memory, Retrospective memory, Subjective memory complaints
National Category
Sociology Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69366 (URN)10.1017/S135561771800053X (DOI)000450425500009 ()2-s2.0-85052846858 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Solomon, A., Turunen, H., Ngandu, T., Peltonen, M., Levalahti, E., Helisalmi, S., . . . Kivipelto, M. (2018). Effect of the Apolipoprotein E Genotype on Cognitive Change During a Multidomain Lifestyle Intervention A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Neurology, 75(4), 462-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of the Apolipoprotein E Genotype on Cognitive Change During a Multidomain Lifestyle Intervention A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial
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2018 (English)In: JAMA Neurology, ISSN 2168-6149, E-ISSN 2168-6157, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 462-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE The role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 allele as an effect modifier in lifestyle interventions to prevent cognitive impairment is still unclear. OBJECTIVE To examine whether the APOE epsilon 4 allele modifies the previously reported significant cognitive benefits of a multidomain lifestyle intervention (prespecified subgroup analysis). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) was a randomized clinical trial in 6 centers across Finland (screening and randomization performed from September 7, 2009, through November 24, 2011; intervention duration, 2 years). Data analysis was performed from August 1, 2015, to March 31, 2016. The study population was at-risk older individuals from the general population. Inclusion criteria were age of 60 to 77 years; Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Dementia risk score of at least 6 points; and cognition at a mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. Individuals with dementia or substantial cognitive impairment and conditions that prevented cooperation or safe engagement in the intervention were excluded. APOE genotype data were available for 1175 of the 1260 participants. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomly assigned in a 1: 1 ratio to a multidomain intervention group (diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk management) or a control group (general health advice). Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants, and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was change in cognition measured through a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. Analysis was based on modified intention to treat (participants with at least 1 postbaseline assessment). RESULTS A total of 1109 participants (mean [SD] age, 69.3 [4.7] years; 514 [46.3%] female) were included in the analysis: 362 APOE epsilon 4 allele carriers (173 intervention and 189 control) and 747 noncarriers (380 intervention and 367 control). The APOE epsilon 4 carriers and noncarriers were not significantly different at baseline (except for serum cholesterol level). The difference between the intervention and control groups in annual neuropsychological test battery total score change was 0.037 (95% CI, 0.001 to 0.073) among carriers and 0.014 (95% CI, -0.011 to 0.039) among noncarriers. Intervention effect was not significantly different between carriers and noncarriers (0.023; 95% CI, -0.021 to 0.067). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Healthy lifestyle changesmay be beneficial for cognition in older at-risk individuals even in the presence of APOE-related genetic susceptibility to dementia. Whether such benefits are more pronounced in APOE epsilon 4 carriers compared with noncarriers should be further investigated. The findings also emphasize the importance of early prevention strategies that target multiple modifiable risk factors simultaneously.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology with an emphasis on medical psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67193 (URN)10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4365 (DOI)000429439000012 ()29356827 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Rosenberg, A., Ngandu, T., Rusanen, M., Antikainen, R., Backman, L., Havulinna, S., . . . Kivipelto, M. (2018). Multidomain lifestyle intervention benefits a large elderly population at risk for cognitive decline and dementia regardless of baseline characteristics: The FINGER trial. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 14(3), 263-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multidomain lifestyle intervention benefits a large elderly population at risk for cognitive decline and dementia regardless of baseline characteristics: The FINGER trial
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2018 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The 2-year Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) multidomain lifestyle intervention trial (NCT01041989) demonstrated beneficial effects on cognition. We investigated whether sociodemographics, socioeconomic status, baseline cognition, or cardiovascular factors influenced intervention effects on cognition. Methods: The FINGER recruited 1260 people from the general Finnish population (60-77 years, at risk for dementia). Participants were randomized 1: 1 to multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognition, and vascular risk management) and regular health advice. Primary outcome was change in cognition (Neuropsychological Test Battery z-score). Prespecified analyses to investigate whether participants' characteristics modified response to intervention were carried out using mixed-model repeated-measures analyses. Results: Sociodemographics (sex, age, and education), socioeconomic status (income), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), cardiovascular factors (body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose, and overall cardiovascular risk), and cardiovascular comorbidity did not modify response to intervention (P-values for interaction > .05). Conclusions: The FINGER intervention was beneficial regardless of participants' characteristics and can thus be implemented in a large elderly population at increased risk for dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67072 (URN)10.1016/j.jalz.2017.09.006 (DOI)000427993000001 ()29055814 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Sipila, S., Tirkkonen, A., Hanninen, T., Laukkanen, P., Alen, M., Fielding, R. A., . . . Tormakangas, T. (2018). Promoting safe walking among older people: the effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on mobility and falls among older community-dwelling men and women (the PASSWORD study): design and methods of a randomized controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 18, Article ID 215.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting safe walking among older people: the effects of a physical and cognitive training intervention vs. physical training alone on mobility and falls among older community-dwelling men and women (the PASSWORD study): design and methods of a randomized controlled trial
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2018 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Safe and stable walking is a complex process involving the interaction of neuromuscular, sensory and cognitive functions. As physical and cognitive functions deteriorate with ageing, training of both functions may have more beneficial effects on walking and falls prevention than either alone. This article describes the study design, recruitment strategies and interventions of the PASSWORD study investigating whether a combination of physical and cognitive training (PTCT) has greater effects on walking speed, dual-task cost in walking speed, fall incidence and executive functions compared to physical training (PT) alone among 70-85-year-old community-dwelling sedentary or at most moderately physically active men and women. Methods: Community-dwelling sedentary or at most moderately physically active, men and women living in the city of Jyvaskyla will be recruited and randomized into physical training (PT) and physical and cognitive training (PTCT). The 12-month interventions include supervised training sessions and home exercises. Both groups attend physical training intervention, which follows the current physical activity guidelines. The PTCT group performes also a web-based computer program targeting executive functions. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months thereafter. Falls data are collected during the interventions and the subsequent one-year follow-up. The primary outcome is 10-m walking speed. Secondary outcomes include 6-min walking distance, dual-task cost in walking speed, fall incidence and executive function assessed with color Stroop and Trail Making A and B tests. Explanatory outcomes include e.g. body composition and bone characteristics, physical performance, physical activity, life-space mobility, fall-related self-efficacy, emotional well-being and personality characteristics. Discussion: The study is designed to capture the additive and possible synergistic effects of physical and cognitive training. When completed, the study will provide new knowledge on the effects of physical and cognitive training on the prevention of walking limitations and rate of falls in older people. The expected results will be of value in informing strategies designed to promote safe walking among older people and may have a significant health and socio-economic impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2018
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69472 (URN)10.1186/s12877-018-0906-0 (DOI)000444654400003 ()30219032 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Malmberg Gavelin, H., Eskilsson, T., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Josefsson, M., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Slunga Järvholm, L. (2018). Rehabilitation for improved cognition in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: RECO – a randomized clinical trial. Stress, 21(4), 279-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rehabilitation for improved cognition in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: RECO – a randomized clinical trial
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2018 (English)In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stress-related exhaustion has been associated with selective and enduring cognitive impairments. However, little is known about how to address cognitive deficits in stress rehabilitation and how this influences stress recovery over time. The aim of this open-label, parallel randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772) was to investigate the long-term effects of 12 weeks cognitive or aerobic training on cognitive function, psychological health, and work ability for patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder (ED). One-hundred-and-thirty-two patients (111 women) participating in multimodal stress rehabilitation were randomized to receive additional cognitive training (n = 44), additional aerobic training (n = 47), or no additional training (n = 41). Treatment effects were assessed before, immediately after and one-year post intervention. The primary outcome was global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes included domain-specific cognition, self-reported burnout, depression, anxiety, fatigue and work ability, aerobic capacity, and sick-leave levels. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed a small but lasting improvement in global cognitive functioning for the cognitive training group, paralleled by a large improvement on a trained updating task. The aerobic training group showed improvements in aerobic capacity and episodic memory immediately after training, but no long-term benefits. General improvements in psychological health and work ability were observed, with no difference between interventional groups. Our findings suggest that cognitive training may be a viable method to address cognitive impairments for patients with ED, whereas the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition may be more limited when performed during a restricted time period. The implications for clinical practice in supporting patients with ED to adhere to treatment are discussed

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Burnout, stress rehabilitation, cognitive training, aerobic training, exhaustion disorder, randomized controlled trial
National Category
Other Health Sciences Physiotherapy Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67312 (URN)10.1080/10253890.2018.1461833 (DOI)000442694000001 ()2-s2.0-85046011368 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, T., Jarvholm, L. S., Gavelin, H. M., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2017). Aerobic training for improved memory in patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry, 17, Article ID 322.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic training for improved memory in patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with stress-related exhaustion suffer from cognitive impairments, which often remain after psychological treatment or work place interventions. It is important to find effective treatments that can address this problem. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects on cognitive performance and psychological variables of a 12-week aerobic training program performed at a moderate-vigorous intensity for patients with exhaustion disorder who participated in a multimodal rehabilitation program. Methods: In this open-label, parallel, randomized and controlled trial, 88 patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder participated in a 24-week multimodal rehabilitation program. After 12 weeks in the program the patients were randomized to either a 12-week aerobic training intervention or to a control group with no additional training. Primary outcome measure was cognitive function, and secondary outcome measures were psychological health variables and aerobic capacity. Results: In total, 51% patients in the aerobic training group and 78% patients in the control group completed the intervention period. The aerobic training group significantly improved in maximal oxygen uptake and episodic memory performance. No additional improvement in burnout, depression or anxiety was observed in the aerobic group compared with controls. Conclusion: Aerobic training at a moderate-vigorous intensity within a multimodal rehabilitation program for patients with exhaustion disorder facilitated episodic memory. A future challenge would be the clinical implementation of aerobic training and methods to increase feasibility in this patient group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology with an emphasis on medical psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65852 (URN)10.1186/s12888-017-1457-1 (DOI)000409560600001 ()28865430 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Gronholm-Nyman, P., Soveri, A., Rinne, J. O., Ek, E., Nyholm, A., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Laine, M. (2017). Limited Effects of Set Shifting Training in Healthy Older Adults. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 9, Article ID 69.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limited Effects of Set Shifting Training in Healthy Older Adults
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2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 9, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our ability to flexibly shift between tasks or task sets declines in older age. As this decline may have adverse effects on everyday life of elderly people, it is of interest to study whether set shifting ability can be trained, and if training effects generalize to other cognitive tasks. Here, we report a randomized controlled trial where healthy older adults trained set shifting with three different set shifting tasks. The training group (n = 17) performed adaptive set shifting training for 5 weeks with three training sessions a week (45 min/session), while the active control group (n = 16) played three different computer games for the same period. Both groups underwent extensive pre-and post-testing and a 1-year follow-up. Compared to the controls, the training group showed significant improvements on the trained tasks. Evidence for near transfer in the training group was very limited, as it was seen only on overall accuracy on an untrained computerized set shifting task. No far transfer to other cognitive functions was observed. One year later, the training group was still better on the trained tasks but the single near transfer effect had vanished. The results suggest that computerized set shifting training in the elderly shows long-lasting effects on the trained tasks but very little benefit in terms of generalization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2017
Keywords
set shifting, task switching, cognitive training, executive functions, normal aging
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65230 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2017.00069 (DOI)000397138200001 ()28386226 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Gavelin, H. M., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Andersson, M., Eskilsson, T., Järvholm, L. S. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2017). Neural activation in stress-related exhaustion: Cross-sectional observations and interventional effects. Psychiatry Research, 269, 17-25, Article ID S0925-4927(17)30054-9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural activation in stress-related exhaustion: Cross-sectional observations and interventional effects
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2017 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 269, p. 17-25, article id S0925-4927(17)30054-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association between burnout and neural activation during working memory processing in patients with stress-related exhaustion. Additionally, we investigated the neural effects of cognitive training as part of stress rehabilitation. Fifty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of exhaustion disorder were administered the n-back task during fMRI scanning at baseline. Ten patients completed a 12-week cognitive training intervention, as an addition to stress rehabilitation. Eleven patients served as a treatment-as-usual control group. At baseline, burnout level was positively associated with neural activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex, the posterior parietal cortex and the striatum, primarily in the 2-back condition. Following stress rehabilitation, the striatal activity decreased as a function of improved levels of burnout. No significant association between burnout level and working memory performance was found, however, our findings indicate that frontostriatal neural responses related to working memory were modulated by burnout severity. We suggest that patients with high levels of burnout need to recruit additional cognitive resources to uphold task performance. Following cognitive training, increased neural activation was observed during 3-back in working memory-related regions, including the striatum, however, low sample size limits any firm conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Burnout, Cognitive training, Exhaustion disorder, Stress rehabilitation, Working memory, fMRI
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64664 (URN)10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.08.008 (DOI)28917154 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Nordvall, O., Jonsson, B. & Stigsdotter Neely, A. (2017). Self-reported and performance-based measures of executive functions in interned youth. Psychology, Crime and Law, 23(3), 240-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported and performance-based measures of executive functions in interned youth
2017 (English)In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 240-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study address three questions: (a) Do interned adolescents exhibit general or specific deficits in the core executive functions, as compared to an age-matched control group? (b) Do interned adolescents report more executive problems in everyday life, as compared to an age-matched control group? And (c) are performance-based measures of executive functions related to self-reported executive problems? Thirty-one interned youths and 40 non-interned controls participated in the study. To this end, we measured the three constituents (inhibition, shifting, and updating) of the Unity/Diversity model of executive functioning, as well as the participants' self-reported everyday executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions scale. The interned group performed less well compared to the control group on the majority of performance-based tasks but did not show more pronounced deficits in any one executive function, reflective of a more general deficit. Compared to the controls, the interned adolescents also reported more dysfunction in executive behaviors related to the ability to inhibit action, behavioral flexibility, working memory, and the ability to follow through with tasks. Overall, correlations between self-report and performance-based measures were weak. These findings suggest that performance-based and self-report measures may assess different, albeit important, aspects of executive functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge journals, Taylor & Francis ltd, 2017
Keywords
Antisocial behavior, adolescence, executive functions, performance-based measures, ratings of behavior
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65229 (URN)10.1080/1068316X.2016.1239725 (DOI)000395410000003 ()
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Nordvall, O., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Jonsson, B. (2017). Self-Reported Impulsivity and its Relation to Executive Functions in Interned youth. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 24(6), 910-922
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Reported Impulsivity and its Relation to Executive Functions in Interned youth
2017 (English)In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 910-922Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In adolescence, antisocial behaviors increase in prevalence, an occurrence that has been related to the parallel increase of impulsive behaviors. However, impulsivity is a conglomerate of unidimensional impulsigenic traits, divided into aspects of behavioral dyscontrol and sensation seeking. In the present study, we examine how these traits differ between interned youth and an aged-matched control group, and how they relate to executive functioning. Results indicate that impulsigenic traits related to behavioral dyscontrol, but not sensation seeking, are more pronounced in interned adolescents. Also, executive functioning was predictive of lack of premeditation, a trait specifically related to antisocial behavior. One implication of this is that interventions improving executive functioning could be beneficial in the rehabilitation of interned adolescents with impulsivity-related problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66420 (URN)10.1080/13218719.2017.1327312 (DOI)000423286000010 ()
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Memory training for persons with Parkinson's diesease [2014-01654_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3450-8067

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